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Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 3:31 pm
by Slava
Any info on this species would be appreciated: SWIM's bioassays, sources for spores, growing experiences, growing :D tips, geographical differences, any and all info, really. SWIM is fixin' to get a few spore prints and try spreading them in well manured soil....up in the North East....

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:59 pm
by fmrc
I have some notes somewhere. Right now I am getting out the TMC, A Mushroom Journal we publish. Should be able to get back to this next week. FMRC offers their spores. www.mushroomsfmrc.com then click "Spore Bank" off of the main menu. slp/fmrc

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2014 11:56 pm
by fmrc
Panaeolus subbalteatus: I believe this mushroom just got a new name, Panaeolus cinctulus (I'm not sure about spelling). It is also has the common name "Girdled Panaeolus" because of a dark belted zone around the edge of the margin. The gills are attached to the stalk. When mature, the gills are black and mottled. The stalk is a reddish-brown and covered with whitish hairs. It bruises mainly at the base of the stalk and not the other parts of the mushroom. The spore print color is black. You find them on composted cow and horse manure or ground that is well manured with same.
It is usually found in June and July. It is found in most of America. It is a common mushroom down here in Florida. It is a psychoactive mushroom containing Psilocybin.
It can be fruited in canning jars using barley and does not require any casing. Because this mushroom produces a controlled substance, it currently is against the law to home cultivate this mushroom. Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 2:28 am
by celphaware2
Why doesn't this species require a casing? What about light cycles, same as other psilly's? Does it typically have smaller yields?

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 12:27 pm
by fmrc
Different species of mushrooms have different fruiting triggers. Some mushrooms fruit due to temperature changes, like this one. Cooler temps cause pins. Some mushrooms pin when their food source is about to run out. This is the casing trick. When the mycelium of this type of mushroom grows up into the casing, it seems its food source has run out and it puts out pins. Ps. cubensis and the common button mushroom are examples of this type of mushroom. Yields can vary. slp/fmrc

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sat Dec 13, 2014 12:35 pm
by fmrc
fmrc ยป Sat Dec 13, 2014 11:27 am

Different species of mushrooms have different fruiting triggers. Some mushrooms fruit due to temperature changes, like this one. Cooler temps cause pins. Some mushrooms pin when their food source is about to run out. .. casing trick. When the mycelium of this type of mushroom grows up into the casing, it seems its food source has run out and it puts out pins. Ps. cubensis and the common button mushroom are examples of this type of mushroom. Yields can vary. slp/fmrc

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sun Dec 14, 2014 11:56 pm
by celphaware2
Thanks, Stephen. So dropping the temp 10 degrees would trigger pinning? Appreciate the fast response. Your knowledge is invaluable. I've missed reading your journal the last few years.

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 11:50 am
by fmrc
10 degrees.......or maybe more. You could always subscribe to our Journals again. slp/fmrc

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:45 am
by celphaware2
I've been thinking about it. Maybe after the new year, and I recover from christmas. You throw in a discounted spore specimen for research? Lol. I'm kidding , I do enjoy your journal and your posts, though, Dr. Poole.

Re: Panaeolus subbalteatus

Posted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 11:42 am
by fmrc
"You throw in a discounted spore specimen for research?" Well, every Issue of our TMC or TEO Journal comes with a free Mushroom Spore Print Sample enclosed inside. Free is better than discounted, right?