Tobacco, I miss it

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woodman
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Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by woodman » Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:29 pm

I haven't smoked tobacco since 1984. I sure loved to smoke cigarettes. I think there is an entheogenic side to them. Subtle, but it is there. Smoking was a ritual and deeply calming. I always felt quite complete with a cigarette burning and the smoke gently curling upward. I believe tobacco helped to focus my thoughts.

It was very hard to quit. I still love the smell when someone lights up in a car or upwind of me. I've had some asbestos exposure so it was a good idea for me to quit. It is claimed the two are symbiotic as far as lung cancer is concerned.

I smoked alot of brands but Winston was my favorite. Pall Mall were really good too.

Addiction is a drag. The only way I was able to quit was by exercising frequently.

I know the shamans use it ritually. Maybe there is more to some tobaccos than meets the eye. Can anyone share insights on tobaccos other than the type used by society?

crazydewman
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by crazydewman » Thu Jan 17, 2008 10:55 pm


morphydox
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by morphydox » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:07 pm

I quit smoking about a year and a half ago, and I don't miss it at all. I find the smell of most cigarettes to be most foul, although some don't smell too bad.

You could probably get away with smoking tobacco as an entheogen occasionally. I've taken a few puffs myself, and haven't gone back to smoking, but only because I don't want to be a smoker, not only because it's unhealthy, but also because of the negtive stigma surrounding it. I also do not date women who smoke, as I don't want to lose a wife to any smoking related disease, and generally non-smoking women prefer to date non-smokers.

I've been in denial about a lot of things in my life, but being addicted to the act of smoking was one I was quite acutely aware of.

The chemicals in tobacco smoke are not relaxing, I can guarantee you that if you smoked a cigarette now, you will not feel very relaxed. The relaxation comes from the deep breathing involved and the pacifier/nipple/thumb sucking effect.

Some factoids regarding tobacco as an entheogen from Pharmacotheon (pp. 373-376):

In Amazonia, nicotiana figures as a transformation agent side by side with anadenathera, banisteriopsis, t. pachanoi, and virola in the were-jaguar complex and lycanthropy in general.

Tobacco preparations are one of the most common and widespread additives to entheogenic ayahuasca brews.

Many shamans feel that the true power in these brews comes from the tobacco.

Go check out the book Tobacco and Shamanism in South America by J. Wilbert. It was written in 1987 and should be at your local library.

It's also been used chewed, potions, lickable preparations, enemas, and snuff in addition to smoking.

South America, out of 233 tribes (from that book)
#1 potions - 64 tribes
#2 chews - 56 tribes
#3 snuffs - 53 tribes
#4 lickable - 16 tribes
#5 enemas - 2 tribes

Other countries it's been employed as an entheogen:
Mexico
North America (west coast)

Has been used as a dart poison

At least one death from overdose has been reported (mistaken consumption)

Huichol Indians have made an inebriating smoking mixture with n. rustica and yahutli (or aka yyahutli or yuahtli or pericon which I know is also known as t. lucida, maybe yahutli is also t. lucida) or t. lucida - which smells wonderful, if I'm not mistaking my plants I've grown.

Snuff with stericulia.

One I would like to give a shot is pituri, duboisia hopwoodii, which also contains nicotine, I believe. Oh, and also scopolamine. Also, hyoscamine.

Also, a related species, d. myoporiodes. Two mouthfulls of the leaf contains approximately 50 mg of nicotine and 20 mg of scopolamine, so one would probably want to start at a tenth or half of a tenth of a gram, chewed, at most. I'd actually rather give that one a shot than d. hopwoodii some night.



So, there's a start. The library will have a TON of information on the history and use of tobacco as an entheogen. Much more so than bits and peices from people here. Any time I have a question, I just head off to the library or hit up various websites. You can check erowid and the lycaeum.

www.erowid.org
www.lycaeum.org

Tobacco is probably covered at length at both of those websites. Also, you can probably google indigenous/native use of tobacco and yield some good results.

If there's a question I can't find a professional answer to that requires an answer from someone regarding personal experience, then I'll pose it a relevant forum.

So, happy hunting. I highly suggest you check out the book I recommended. You can use the search function here to get some answers as well.

Oh, and you may wish to modify your reaction to the smell of smoke so you don't feel tempted. People CAN go decades without smoking and get caught up in it again.

Here's the erowid tobacco vault to start. http://erowid.org/plants/tobacco/tobacco.shtml After looking it over, I think I wasted almost an hour typing passages from pharmacotheon and should have just pointed you in that direction. I want my 45 minutes back!!! :) Before asking a basic question, try out the resources I mentioned first. Erowid and The Lycaeum are both good resources for information, and tobacco is one of the most researched ethnobotanicals on the face of the earth, if not THE most! There are quite a few books listed there that outline entheogenic and native use of tobacco there that you can check out at the library or purchase. Tons of resources there as well.

Maybe some can add personal experience, but even the erowid link alone should answer any and all questions you have about tobacco.

Oh, and I'll add that now I'm addicted to lollipops, so now I'll die from diabetes and have rotten teeth. I shouldn't joke around about that, though. I just met a guy who lost a leg because of diabetes. It's not really a laughing matter. I should probably switch to sugar-less.
Last edited by morphydox on Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Diabeetus!

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Entheogenetics
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by Entheogenetics » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:07 pm

I started smoking pipe tobacco after stopping an unmentionable after years of constant use (literally at least ten times a day) because I realized always being under the influence was putting me way behind in life. I eventually came to enjoy tobacco but whenever I go on an unmentionable binge I have no desire for it, even if I've been smoking it for a year straight. No noticable withdrawal at all. My addiction to smoking is purely psychological. I think it's oral fixation, or perhaps having something to do with my hands.

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sunsnail
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by sunsnail » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:30 pm

I find the smell to be comforting. I need to quit soon.

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beegeezy
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by beegeezy » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:44 pm

I found the smell comfortable, the act of smoking was the most addictive part of it though, I felt I needed the motions. When I quit I actually had physical withdrawal symptoms, I felt sick-as if my stomach was going to fall out and puking. that only lasted for two days though, and I promised myself I would never smoke tobacco like that again. It also strengthened my resolve to not get addicted to anything else again. Id like to try nicotiana, but Im done with chewing and smoking every day.

woodman
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by woodman » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:46 pm

Thank you all for your replies. Very interesting posts. I have all the info in the world at my fingertips but I find that it is so much more interesting to hear replies such as these. I can learn more in 5 minutes from you folks than in 15 minutes of reading from web sites and articles. Not that I don't read and investigate.

My old chemistry book tells me that the phosphate fertilizers used on the tobacco fields contain trace amounts of Uranium 238. This has been implicated in the link between cigarette smoking and cancer and heart disease. It seems the decay of uranium 238 produces Rn 222. It also produces the radioactive nuclides Po 210 and Pb 210, (polonium and lead). Radon, polonium and lead! What a bitch! Modern agriculture at its best.

crazydewman
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by crazydewman » Thu Jan 17, 2008 11:55 pm

yea
fuck cigarettes!

homegrown's the way to go

The chemicals in tobacco smoke are not relaxing, I can guarantee you that if you smoked a cigarette now, you will not feel very relaxed. The relaxation comes from the deep breathing involved and the pacifier/nipple/thumb sucking effect.
nicotine is actually also a relaxant....
but before those effects stimulation is felt
afterall nicotine poisoning leads to respritory failure (a CNS depressant effect)

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Arne
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by Arne » Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:08 am

I'm a quiter, many years without lighting up, but I could only do it with Skoal.
You know how addictive those are?
A can of the Bandits every three days, but they are minty.
Salvia likes them.

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ekorocket
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Re: Tobacco, I miss it -

Post by ekorocket » Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:14 am

I'm sad to admit that I fell back into occasional smoking after being off the shit for almost 6 months. Really is the ultimate addiction. And, mind you, not only are you fucking yourself up with smoking, you're also screwing Mother Earth in ways that she sure doesn't like. Smoking destroys forests, benefits multinational corporations, adds to child labor and poor working conditions, rips off farmers in developing countries, whatnot.

Nevertheless, it really is like heroin regarding its addictive potential. This kind of thread could act a bit of a peer group, though ;)

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