The Philosopher's Stone

Here is the place to discuss philosophy, religion, and spirituality.
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Moloch
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The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by Moloch » Wed Dec 06, 2006 12:49 am

What do you guys think about the philosopher's stone?

It sounds far fetched, but dozens of well respected philosophers of the past centuries have said they have seen it's work first hand.

I have seen descriptions of said artifact that all agree it is not a stone, but a red powder. There is even supposed to be a medallion preserved in Vienna that was half-turned into gold from silver...

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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by catfish » Wed Dec 06, 2006 2:40 am

stones can be had
where i have no idea
sposed to be truffle-like
;)
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Azagaroth
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by Azagaroth » Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:44 am

The only philosophers stones I have had were mushroom truffles... What is this artifact you speak of? Any pictures? Perhaps I will do a search later on.

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Moloch
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by Moloch » Wed Dec 06, 2006 7:28 pm

Oh, boy., you guys sound serious.

Have you not heard of the philosopher's stone? the one that turns lead into gold, etc.?

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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by catfish » Wed Dec 06, 2006 10:15 pm

how do you know they arent one and the same?
;)
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frog
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by frog » Thu Dec 07, 2006 12:36 am

i have been doing alot of research on this lately. i find it intriguing and i would love to hear more about this subject. it seems alchemy is the basis for the stone, the elixer of life and trasmutaion of metels and human life.

have you ever read the Alchemist? if not you need to Moloch it talks about this alot.

peace

frog

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frog
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by frog » Mon Dec 11, 2006 9:24 pm

In the history of science, alchemy refers to both an early form of the investigation of nature and an early philosophical and spiritual discipline, both combining elements of chemistry, metallurgy, physics, medicine, astrology, semiotics, mysticism, spiritualism, and art. Alchemy has been practiced in Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Persia, India, and China, in Classical Greece and Rome, in Muslim civilization, and then in Europe up to the 19th century—in a complex network of schools and philosophical systems spanning at least 2500 years.

Western alchemy has always been closely connected with Hermeticism, a philosophical and spiritual system that traces its roots to Hermes Trismegistus, a syncretic Egyptian-Greek deity and legendary alchemist. These two disciplines influenced the birth of Rosicrucianism, an important esoteric movement of the seventeenth century. In the course of the early modern period, mainstream alchemy evolved into modern chemistry.

Today, the discipline is of interest mainly to historians of science and philosophy, and for its mystic, esoteric, and artistic aspects. Nevertheless, alchemy was one of the main precursors of modern sciences, and many substances and processes of ancient alchemy continue to be the mainstay of modern chemical and metallurgical industries.

Although alchemy takes on many forms, in pop culture it is most often cited in stories, films, shows, and games as the process used to change lead (or other elements) into gold.

The best known goals of the alchemists were the transmutation of common metals into gold or silver, and the creation of a "panacea," a remedy that supposedly would cure all diseases and prolong life indefinitely. Although these were not the only uses for the science, they were the ones most documented and well known. Starting with the Middle Ages, European alchemists invested much effort on the search for the "philosopher's stone", a legendary substance that was believed to be an essential ingredient for either or both of those goals. The philosopher's stone was believed to mystically amplify the user's knowledge of alchemy so much that anything was attainable. Alchemists enjoyed prestige and support through the centuries, though not for their pursuit of those goals, nor the mystic and philosophical speculation that dominates their literature. Rather it was for their mundane contributions to the "chemical" industries of the day—the invention of gunpowder, ore testing and refining, metalworking, production of ink, dyes, paints, and cosmetics, leather tanning, ceramics and glass manufacture, preparation of extracts and liquors, and so on (It seems that the preparation of aqua vitae, the "water of life", was a fairly popular "experiment" among European alchemists).

On the other hand, alchemists never had the inclination to separate the physical (chemical) aspects of their craft from the metaphysical interpretations. Indeed, from antiquity until well into the Modern Age, a physics devoid of metaphysical insight would have been as unsatisfying as a metaphysics devoid of physical manifestation. For one thing, the lack of common words for chemical concepts and processes, as well as the need for secrecy, led alchemists to borrow the terms and symbols of biblical and pagan mythology, astrology, kabbalah, and other mystic and esoteric fields; so that even the plainest chemical recipe ended up reading like an abstruse magic incantation. Moreover, alchemists sought in those fields the theoretical frameworks into which they could fit their growing collection of disjointed experimental facts.

Starting with the middle ages, some alchemists increasingly came to view these metaphysical aspects as the true foundation of alchemy; and chemical substances, physical states, and material processes as mere metaphors for spiritual entities, states and transformations. Thus, both the transmutation of common metals into gold and the universal panacea symbolized evolution from an imperfect, diseased, corruptible and ephemeral state towards a perfect, healthy, incorruptible and everlasting state; and the philosopher's stone then represented some mystic key that would make this evolution possible. Applied to the alchemist himself, the twin goal symbolized his evolution from ignorance to enlightenment, and the stone represented some hidden spiritual truth or power that would lead to that goal. In texts that are written according to this view, the cryptic alchemical symbols, diagrams, and textual imagery of late alchemical works typically contain multiple layers of meanings, allegories, and references to other equally cryptic works; and must be laboriously "decoded" in order to discover their true meaning.

some stuff? pretty interesting

peace

frog

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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by catfish » Tue Dec 12, 2006 10:33 am

how do you know they arent one and the same?
like i said ...
The philosopher's stone was believed to mystically amplify the user's knowledge of alchemy so much that anything was attainable.
again i say...
;)
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frog
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by frog » Tue Dec 12, 2006 1:54 pm

can anyone explain this truffle?

i dont understand catfish? are you talking about the stone and the truffles being the same thing?

is it, eat the truffle to attain the knowledge? what truffle?

latro

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frog
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Re: The Philosopher's Stone -

Post by frog » Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:27 pm

its a mushoom of some sort or so i thought? pigs like'em right?

peace

frog

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