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Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 2:45 pm
by SashaGallagher
DEATH THE SWEETHEART
There was once a pretty young girl with no husband, no father, no mother, no brothers, no kinsfolk: they were all dead and gone. She lived alone in a hut at the end of the village; and no one came near her, and she never went near any one. One evening a goodly wanderer came to her, opened the door, and cried, 'I am a wanderer, and have been far in the world. Here will I rest; I can no further go.' The maiden said, 'Stay here, I will give thee a mattress to sleep on, and, if thou wilt, victuals and drink too.' The goodly wanderer soon lay down and said, 'Now once again I sleep; it is long since I slept last:' 'How long?' asked the girl; and he answered, 'Dear maid, I sleep but one week in a thousand years.' The girl laughed and said, 'Thou jestest, surely? thou art a roguish fellow.' But the wanderer was sound asleep.

Early next morning he arose and said, 'Thou art a pretty young girl. If thou wilt, I will tarry here a whole week longer.' She gladly agreed, for already she loved the goodly wanderer. So once they were sleeping, and she roused him and said, 'Dear man, I dreamt such an evil dream. I dreamt thou hadst grown cold and white, and we drove in a beautiful carriage, drawn by six white birds. Thou didst blow on a mighty horn; then dead folk came up and went with us--thou wert their king.' Then answered the goodly wanderer, ' That was an evil dream.' Straightway he arose and said, 'Beloved, I must go, for not a soul has died this long while in all the world. I must off, let me go.' But the girl wept and said, 'Go not away; bide with me.' 'I must go,' he answered, 'God keep thee.' But, as he reached her his hand, she said sobbing, 'Tell me, dear man, who thou art then.' 'Who knows that dies,' said the wanderer, 'thou askest vainly; I tell thee not who I am.' Then the girl wept and said, 'I will suffer everything, only do tell me who thou art.' 'Good,' said the man,' 'then thou comest with me. I am Death.' The girl shuddered and died.

THE DOG AND THE MAIDEN
There was once a poor Gypsy with a very beautiful daughter, whom he guarded like the apple of his eye, for he wanted to marry her to a chieftain. So he always kept her in the tent when the lads and lasses sat of an evening by the fire and told stories, or beguiled the time with play and dance. Only a dog was the constant companion of this poor maiden. No one knew whom the dog belonged to, or where he came from. He had joined the band once, and thenceforth continued the trusty companion of the poor beautiful maiden.

It befell once that her father must go to a far city, to sell there his besoms, baskets, spoons, and troughs. He left his daughter with the other women in the tents on the heath, and set out with the men for the city. This troubled the poor girl greatly, for no one would speak to her, as all the women envied her for her beauty and avoided her; in a word, they hated the sight of her. Only the dog remained true to her; and once, as she sat sorrowfully in front of the tent, he said, 'Come, let us go out on the heath; there I will tell you who I really am.' The girl was terrified, for she had never heard of a dog being able to speak like a man; but when the dog repeated his request, she got up and went with him out on the heath. There the dog said, 'Kiss me, and I shall become a man.' The girl kissed him, and lo! before her stood a man of wondrous beauty. He sat down beside her in the grass, and told how a fairy had turned him into a dog for trying to steal her golden apples, and how he could resume his human shape for but one night in the year, and only then if a girl had kissed him first. Much more had the two to tell, and they toyed in the long grass all the livelong night. When day dawned, the girl slipped back with the dog to her tent; and the two henceforth were the very best of friends.

The poor Gypsy came back from the city to the heath, merry because he had made a good bit of money. When again he must go to the city to sell his besoms and spoons, the girl remained behind with the dog in the camp, and one night she brought forth a little white puppy. In her terror and anguish she ran to the great river, and jumped into the water. When the people sought to draw her out of the water, they could not find her corpse; and the old Gypsy, her father, would have thrown himself in too, when a handsome strange gentleman came up, and said, 'I'll soon get you the body.' He took a bit of bread, kissed it, and threw it into the water. The dead girl straightway emerged from the water. The people drew the corpse to land, and bore it back to the tents, in three days' time to bury it. But the strange gentleman said, 'I will bring my sweetheart to life.' And he took the little white puppy, the dead girl's son, and laid it on the bosom of the corpse. The puppy began to suck, and when it had sucked its full, the dead girl awoke, and, on seeing the handsome man, started up and flew into his arms, for he was her lover who had lived with her as a white dog.

All greatly rejoiced when they heard this marvellous story, and nobody thought of the little white puppy, the son of the beautiful Gypsy girl. All of a sudden they heard a baby cry; and when they looked round, they saw a little child lying in the grass. Then was the joy great indeed. The little puppy had vanished and taken human shape. So they celebrated marriage and baptism together, and lived in wealth and prosperity till their happy end.

THE GOLDEN HAIRS OF THE SUN KING
A rich, mighty king once went hunting, and wandered himself in a great forest. Towards evening he came to a hut, in which lived a poor charcoal-burner. The king asked the poor man his way to the city.

The charcoal-burner answered, 'Sir, the way to the city you could not find by yourself, and to-day I cannot go with you for my wife lies sick, and this very night will bring a child into the world. Lie down here then in the side room, and to-morrow I will guide you to the city.'

The king took the offer, and lay down in the side room; but he could not close an eye for the moaning of the charcoal-burner's wife. Towards midnight she bore a beautiful boy, and now it was quiet in the hut. Yet still the king could not sleep. He got up from his couch, drew near the door, and looked through a chink into the room where the sick woman lay. He could see her sleeping in her bed; her man, fast asleep too, lay behind the stove; and in its cradle was the new-born child, with three ladies in white standing round it.

The king heard one say, 'I wish this boy a misfortune.' The second said, 'And I grant him a means to turn this misfortune to good.'

The third said, 'I will bring to pass his marriage with the daughter of the king who is now in the next room. At this very moment his wife is bringing into the world a girl of marvellous beauty.'

Thereupon the three ladies departed; and the king thought and thought how to destroy this boy. Early next morning the charcoal-burner came into the side room and said, weeping, to the king, 'My poor wife is dead. What can I do with the little child?'

The king answered, quite rejoiced, 'I am the king, and will care for the child. Only show me the way to the city, and I will send one of my servants to fetch the child.'

And so it was. The charcoal-burner guided his king to the city and was richly rewarded; and the king sent a servant back with secret instructions to fling the boy into the river and let him drown. When now the servant was returning from the forest with the child, he flung it, basket and all, into the river, and told the king, 'Most gracious king, I have done as thou hast commanded me.' The king rewarded him, and went now to his wife, who the night before had borne a girl of marvellous beauty.

The basket with the boy went floating about a long time on the water, and at last was seen by a fisherman who drew it out, and took the child home to his wife. They both rejoiced greatly at the sight of this pretty boy; and as they had no children they kept him and brought him up.

Twenty years went by; and the boy, whom his parents called Nameless, grew up a wonderfully pretty lad. Once the king passed the fisherman's hut, and saw the fair youngster. He entered the hut and asked the fisherman, 'Is this pretty youngster your son?'

'No,' said the fisherman, 'twenty years ago I fished him out of the water.'

Then the king was exceeding terrified, and said presently, I will write a letter to the queen, and this lad shall take it to her.'

So he wrote this letter: 'Dear wife, have this lad put forthwith to death, else he will undo us all.'

Nameless set out with the letter for the queen, but on his way to the city lost himself in a forest, and there met a lady in white who said to him, 'You have lost yourself. Come to my hut, and rest a bit; then I'll soon bring you to the queen.'

She led Nameless to her hut, and there he fell fast asleep. The old lady took the letter from his pocket, burnt it, and put another in its stead. When the lad awoke, to his great amazement he found himself in front of the king's house. So he went in to the queen and gave her the letter, in which stood written: 'Dear wife, at once call the pope, and let him plight this lad to our daughter. I wish him to marry her, else a great ill will befall us.'

The queen did as her husband, the king, desired. She bade call the pope, and Nameless and the king's fair daughter became man and wife. When the king came home and learnt of this wedding, he had the letter brought, and saw it was his own handwriting. Then he asked his son-in-law where he had been and whom he had spoken with; and when Nameless told him about the lady in white, the king knew that the fairy 1 had aided him. Nameless was not at all the son-in-law he wanted, and he sought to make away with him, so said, 'Go into the world and fetch me three golden hairs from the head of the Sun-King, then shall you be king along with me.'

Sorrowfully Nameless set out, for he loved his young wife, and she too loved him dearly. As he wandered on he came to a great black lake, and saw a white boat floating on the water. He cried to the old man in it, 'Boat ahoy! come and ferry me over.'

The old man answered, 'I will take you across if you'll promise to bring me word how to escape out of this boat, for only then can I die.'

Nameless promised, and the old man ferried him over the black water. Soon after Nameless came to a great city, where an old man asked him, 'Whither away?'

'To the Sun-King,' said Nameless.

'Couldn't be better. Come, I'll bring you to our king, who'll have something to say to you.'

The king, when Nameless stood before him, said, 'Twenty years ago there was in our city a spring whose water made every one that drank of it grow young. The spring has vanished, and only the Sun-King knows where it is gone to. You are journeying to him, so ask him where it is gone to, and bring us word.'

Nameless promised him to bring word on his return, and departed. Some days after he came to another city, and there another old man met him and asked, 'Whither away?'

'To the Sun-King,' said Nameless.

'That's capital. Come, I'll bring you to our king, who'll have something to say to you.'

When they came to the king, the king said, 'Twenty years ago a tree in this city bore golden apples; whoso ate of those apples grew strong and healthy, and died not. But now for twenty years this tree has put forth no more fruit, and only the Sun-King knows the reason why. So when you come to him, ask him about it, and bring us word.'

Nameless promised him to bring word on his return, and departed. Some days after he reached a great mountain, and there saw an old lady in white sitting in front of a beautiful house. She asked him, 'Whither away?'

'I seek the Sun-King,' said Nameless.

'Come in then,' said the old lady. 'I am the mother of the Sun-King, who daily flies out of this house as a little child, at mid-day becomes a man, and returns of an evening a greybeard.'

She brought Nameless into the house, and made him tell her his story. He told her of the man on the black lake, of the spring, and of the tree that used to bear golden apples.

Then said the old lady, 'I will ask my son all about that. But come, let me hide you; for if my son finds you here he'll burn you up.'

She hid Nameless in a great vessel of water, and bade him keep quiet. At evening the Sun-King came home, a feeble old man with golden head, and got victuals and drink from his mother. When he had eaten and drunk, he laid his golden head in his mother's lap and fell fast asleep. Then the old lady twitched out a golden hair, and he cried, 'Mother, why won't you let me sleep?'

The old lady answered, 'I saw in a dream a city with a tree which used to bear golden apples, and whoso ate of them grew well and healthy, and died not. For twenty years now the tree has put forth no more fruit, and the people know not what they ought to do.'

The Sun-King said, 'They should kill the serpent that gnaws at the root of the tree.'

Again he slept, and after a while his mother twitched out a second hair. Then cried the Sun-King, 'Mother, what's the meaning of this? why can't you let me sleep?'

The old lady answered, 'My dear son, I dreamed of a city with a spring, and whoso drank of it grew young again. Twenty years has this spring ceased to flow, and the people know not what they should do.'

The Sun-King said, 'A great toad is blocking the source of the spring. They should kill the toad, then the spring will flow as before.'

Again he slept, and after a while the old lady in white twitched out a third hair. Then cried the Sun-King, Mother, do let me sleep.'

The old lady answered, 'I saw in a dream a great black lake with an old man rowing about it in a boat, and he doesn't know how to escape from the boat, for only then can he die.'

The Sun-King said, 'Next time he takes any one over, let him hand him the oars and jump ashore himself; then the other must stop in the boat, and the old man can die.'

Again he slept.

Early next morning the Sun-King arose as a lovely child, and flew out of the window. The old lady gave Nameless the three hairs and said, 'Now go to your wife, and give the king the three hairs. I have done for you all that at your birth I promised my sisters. And now farewell.'

She kissed Nameless, and led him outside, and he started off homewards. When he came to the city where the spring had ceased to flow, he told the people to kill the great toad that blocked up the source. They looked, found the toad, and killed it; then the spring flowed again, and the king rewarded him richly. When Nameless came to the city where for twenty years the tree had ceased to bear golden apples, he told the people to kill the serpent that was gnawing the roots of the tree. The people dug down, found the serpent, and killed it. Then the tree again bore golden fruit, and the king rewarded him richly. When Nameless reached the black lake, the old man would not take him across. But Nameless said if he would he would tell him the secret then, so the old man took him across the black water. When he was out of the boat he told the old man to hand his oars to the next passenger and then jump ashore himself; so he would be free and at last could die, but the other would have to go rowing about on the lake.

Nameless soon got back home, and gave the king the three golden hairs; his wife rejoiced greatly, but her father was beside himself for rage. But when Nameless told of the spring and the golden apples, the king cried quite delighted, 'I too must drink of this spring; I too must eat of these golden apples.' He set out instantly, but when he reached the black lake, the old man handed him the oars and jumped ashore. And the king could not leave the boat, and had to stop there on the water. As he never came home, Nameless became king of the country, and lived henceforth with his beautiful bride in peace and prosperity.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 4:42 pm
by SashaGallagher
THE THREE GIRLS
SOMEWHERE there was a king who had three daughters, princesses. Those three sisters used to go to meet the devils, and the father knew not where they went to. But there was one called Jankos; Halenka aided him.

The king asks Jankos, 'Don't you know where my daughters go? Not one single night are they at home, and they are always wearing out new shoes.'

Then Jankos lay down in front of the door, and kept watch to see where they went to. But Halenka told him everything; she aided him. 'They will, when they come, fling fire on you, and prick you with needles.' Halenka told him he must not stir, but be like a corpse.

They came, those devils, for the girls, and straightway the girls set out with them to hell. On; on, they walked, but he stuck close to them. As the girls went to hell he followed close behind, but so that they knew it not. He went through the diamond forest; when he came there he cut himself a diamond twig from the forest. He follows; straightway they, those girls, cried, 'Jankos is coming behind us.' For when he broke it, he made a great noise. The girls heard it. 'Jankos is coming behind us.'

But the devils said, 'What does it matter if he is?'

Next they went through the forest of glass, and once more he cut off a twig; now he had two tokens. Then they went through the golden forest, and once more he cut off a twig; so now he had three. Then Halenka tells him, 'I shall change you into a fly, and when you come into hell, creep under the bed, hide yourself there, and see what will happen.'

Then the devils danced with the girls, who tore their shoes all to pieces, for they danced upon blades of knives, and so they must tear them. Then they flung the shoes under the bed, where Jankos took them, so that he might show them at home. When the devils had danced with the girls, each of them threw his girl upon the bed and lay with her; thus did they with two of them, but the third would not yield herself. Then Jankos, having got all he wanted, returned home and lay down again in front of the door, 'that the girls may know I am lying here.'

The girls returned after midnight, and went to bed in their room as if nothing had happened. But Jankos knew well what had happened, and straightway he went to their father, the king, and showed him the tokens. 'I know where your daughters go--to hell. The three girls must own they were there, in the fire. Isn't it true? weren't you there? And if you believe me not, I will show you the tokens. See, here is one token from the diamond forest; then here is one from the forest of glass; a third from the golden forest; and the fourth is the shoes which you tore dancing with the devils. And two of you lay with the devils, but that third one not, she would not yield herself.'

Straightway the king seized his rifle, and straightway he shot them dead. Then he seized a knife, and slit up their bellies, and straightway the devils were scattered out from their bellies. Then he buried them in the church, and laid each coffin in front of the altar, and every night a soldier stood guard over them. But every night those two used to rend the soldier in pieces; more than a hundred were rent thus. At last it fell to a new soldier, a recruit, to stand guard; when he went upon guard he was weeping. But a little old man came to him--it was my God; and Jankos was there with the soldier. And the old man tells him, 'When the twelfth hour strikes and they come out of their coffins, straightway jump in and lie down in-the coffin, and don't leave the coffin, for if you do they will rend you. So don't you go out, even if they beg you and fling fire on you, for they will beg you hard to come out.'

Thus then till morning he lay in the coffin. In the morning those two were alive again, and both kneeling in front of the altar. They were lovelier than ever. Then the soldier took one to wife, and Jankos took the other. Then when they came home with them their father was very glad. Then Jankos and the soldier got married, and if they are not dead they are still alive.

THE DRAGON
There was a great city. In that city was great mourning; every day it was hung with black cloth and with red. There was in a cave a great dragon; it had four-and-twenty heads. Every day must he eat a woman--ah! God! what can be done in such a case? It is clean impossible every day to find food for that dragon. There was but one girl left. Her father was a very wealthy man; he was a king; over all kings he was lord. And there came a certain wanderer, came into the city, and asked what's new there.

They said to him, 'Here is very great mourning.'

'Why so? any one dead?'

'Every day we must feed the dragon with twenty-four heads. If we failed to feed him, he would crush all our city underneath his feet.'

'I'll help you out of that. It is just twelve o'clock; I will go there alone with my dog.'

He had such a big dog: whatever a man just thought of, that dog immediately knew. It would have striven with the very devil. When the wanderer came to the cave, he kept crying, 'Dragon, come out here with your blind mother. Bread and men you have eaten, but will eat no more. I'll see if you are any good.'

The dragon called him into his cave, and the wanderer said to him, 'Now give me whatever I ask for to eat and to drink, and swear to me always to give that city peace, and never to eat men, no, not one. For if ever I hear of your doing so I shall come back and cut your throat.'

'My good man, fear not; I swear to you. For I see you're a proper man. If you weren't, I should long since have eaten up you and your dog. Then tell me what you want of me.'

'I only want you to bring me the finest wine to drink, and meat such as no man has ever eaten. If you don't, you will see I shall destroy everything that is yours, shall shut you up here, and you will never come out of this cave.'

'Good, I will fetch a basket of meat, and forthwith cook it for you.'

He went and brought him such meat as no man ever had eaten. When he had eaten and drunk his fill, then the dragon must swear to him never to eat anybody, but sooner to die of hunger.

'Good, so let us leave it.'

He went back, that man, who thus had delivered the city, so that it had peace. Then all the gentlemen asked him what he wanted for doing so well. The dragon from that hour never ate any one. And if they are not dead they are still alive.

THE PRINCESS AND THE FORESTER'S SON
Somewhere or other there lived a forester. He ill-used his wife and his children, and often got drunk. Then the mother said, 'My children, the father is always beating us, so we'll get our things together and leave him. We will wander out into the world, whither our eyes lead us.'

They took their things, and followed the road through a great forest. They journeyed two days and two nights without reaching any place, so the eldest son said to his mother, 'Mother, dear, night has come on us, let us sleep here.'

'My children,' said the mother, 'pluck moss, make a resting-place, and we will lie down here to sleep.'

The elder son said to his brother, 'Go for wood.'

They made a fire, and seated themselves by it.

Then said the elder son to his brother, 'Now, you must keep watch, for there are wild beasts about, so that we be not devoured. Do you sleep first; then you'll get up, I lie down to sleep, then you will watch again.'

So the younger brother lay down near his mother to sleep; the elder kept watch with his gun. Then he thought within himself, and said, 'Great God! wherever are we in these great forests? Surely we soon must perish.' He climbed up a high tree, and looked all round, till a light flashed in his eyes. When he saw the light, he took his hat from his head, and let it drop. 1 Then he climbed down, and looked to see if his mother was all right. From the spot where his hat lay he walked straight forward for a good distance, a whole half hour. Then he observed a fire. Who were there but four-and-twenty robbers, cooking and drinking? He went through the wood, keeping out of their sight, and loaded his gun; and, just as one of them was taking a drink of wine, he shot the jug right from his lips, so that only the handle was left in his hand. And his gun was so constructed that it made no report.

Then the robber said to his comrade, 'Comrade, why won't you let me alone, but knock the jug out of my mouth?' You fool, I never touched you.'

He took a pull out of another jug, and the lad loaded again. He sat on a tree, and again shot the jug--shot it away from his mouth, so that the handle remained in his hand.

Then the first robber said, 'Will you leave me alone, else I'll pay you out with this knife?'

But his comrade stepped up to him, looking just like a fool; at last he said, 'My good fellow, I am not touching you. See, it is twice that has happened; maybe it is some one in the forest. Take your gun, and let's go and look if there is not some one there.'

They went and they hunted, searched every tree, and found him, the forester's son, sitting on a tree at the very top. They said to him, 'You earth-devil, come down. If you won't, we'll shoot at you till you fall down from the tree.'

But he would not come. Again they ordered him. What was the poor fellow to do? He had to come. When he was down, they each seized him by an arm, and he thought to himself, 'Things look bad with me. I shall never see my mother and brother again. They'll either kill me, or tie me up to a tree.'

They brought him to the fire and asked him, 'What are you?--are you a craftsman?'

'I am one of your trade.'

'If you are of our trade, eat, drink, and smoke as much as your heart desires.'

When he had eaten and drunk, they said, 'Since you are such a clever chap, and such a good shot, there is a castle with a princess in it, whom we went after, but could not come at her anyhow, this princess. Maybe, as you are so smart, there's a big dog yonder that made us run, but as you are such a good shot, and your gun makes no report, you'll kill this dog, and then we'll make you our captain.'

Then they broke up camp, took something to eat and to drink, and came to the castle. When they reached the castle the dog made a great noise. They lifted him up, the forester's son; he aimed his gun, and, as the dog sprang at him, he fired and hit him. The dog made ten more paces, and fell to the earth. As he fell, the lad said to the robbers, 'Comrades, the dog is dead.'

'Brave fellow,' said they, 'now you shall be our captain, for killing the dog; but one thing more you must do. We will make a hole for you in the wall. When we have done that, then--you are so slender--you will creep through the hole.' 1

They made the hole, and he crept through it. Then the robbers said to him, 'Here you, you have to go up a flight of steps, and at the fourth flight you will come to a door. There is one door, two doors, three doors.'

So through each door he passed; then he passed through the third, there were a quantity of swords. He saw they were very fine swords, and took one of them. Then he went to the fourth, opened it slowly; it did not stop him, for the keys were there. Through the keyhole he saw a bed. Then he opened it, and went in. There he saw a princess lying, quite naked, but 1 covered with a cloth of gold. At her feet stood a table, on which lay a pair of golden scissors. There were golden clasps, and there were two rings, and her name was engraved inside one of them. And when he sees her sleeping thus, he thought, 'O great God, what if I were to lie down beside her! Do, my God, as thou wilt.' So he took the scissors, and cut off half the cloth of gold, and lay down beside her; and she could not awake. Then he arose, and took to himself the half of the coverlet and one of the rings and one of her slippers, and went out, taking the sword with him, and shutting the door. As he passed through the fourth door he said to himself, 'I must open it carefully, so as not to waken her mother and father.' He got out safely, then he went through the courtyard to the robbers. When he reached the hole he said to them, 'My dear men, I know where she is. Come, we'll soon have the princess, but you must creep through the hole one after the other.' Then he drew his sword, and, as one came through after the other, he seized him by the head, cut off his head, and cast him aside. When he had done so to the twenty-fourth, he cast away the sword, and returned by the way that he had come to his mother, where they had slept. (He had thought never again to see his mother and his brother.) When he came to his mother, he said, 'Mother, how do you find yourself? you must be sleepy.'

His mother asked him, 'My dear son, how have you managed to do with so little sleep?'

His younger brother said, 'Why didn't you wake me up?' You were so sleepy, I let you sleep.'

Then they made a fire, ate and drank, and wandered on again through the forest. They arrived in a town, and sought employment. The mother said to her eldest son, 'My son, we will stay at least a year here.' She fortunately got a place at a big house as cook, and the two lads went as servants to an innkeeper. When they had been a year there, the mother said to her two sons, 'Just see how well off we were at home, and here we have to work, and I an old body.

You are young folk, and can stick to it, but I am old, and can't stand it any longer. The father ill-used us; still, let us return home, if the Lord God gives us health and strength to do so.'

So they made ready; the landlord paid them their wages; and they set out. They went by the very way that he had gone by to the castle where he killed the twenty-four robbers.

But how had they got on there since the year when he did that to her? The princess had borne a child, but she knew not who was the father. She had a tavern built not far from the castle, and said to her mother, ' Mother dear, see what has befallen me, and how I now am. But I know not whom the child is by. You have let me have the tavern built. Whoever comes there I will entertain gratis, and ask him what he has learned in the world--whether he has any story to tell me, or whether he has had any strange experiences. Perhaps the man will turn up by whom I had the child.'

As luck would have it, the two brothers came through the village where the tavern was. There was a large sign-board, on which was written, 'Every man may eat and drink to his heart's desire, and smoke, only he must relate his experiences that he has gone through in the world.' The elder lad said to his brother, 'Brother dear, where are we? I don't myself know.' But right well he knew whom the tavern belonged to. They halted. Then he looked at the notice, and said to his mother, 'See, mother dear, see what that is. See there is written that the victuals and drink are gratis.'

'Let us go in, my son; we are very hungry, anyhow. Sure, we'll find something to tell her, if only she'll give us to eat and to drink.'

They went into the tavern. Straightway the hostess greeted them, and said, 'Good-day, where do you come from?'

'We come from a town out yonder. We have been working there; now we want to return home, where my husband is.'

She said, 'Good. What might you drink, what will you eat? I will give you just what you want.'

'Ah, my God! ' said she, 'kind lady, if you would be so good as to give us something. We know you are a kind lady.'

So she said to her women-servants, 'Bring wine here, bring beer here, bring food here, and for the two men bring something to smoke.'

When they brought it, they ate and drank.

'Now,' said the princess--the seeming hostess, but they knew not that she was a princess; only the elder brother knew it--'oh! if only you would tell me something. Come, you, old wife, what have you seen in your time?'

'Why, my good lady, I have gone through plenty. When I was at home, my man drank much, ran through my money. When he got drunk, he'd come home, scold and knock me about, smash everything that came to hand, and as for his children, he couldn't bear the sight of them. He scolded and knocked them about till they didn't know where they were. At last I said to my children, "My children, since I can't get on with my man, and he uses us so badly, let us take our few things, and go off into the world."'

The hostess listened, brought the old wife a mug of beer, and gave it her. When she had drunk, the hostess said, Speak on.'

'Well, we set off and journeyed through the great forests, where we must go on and on, two whole days, without ever lighting on town or village. Never a peasant was to be seen, and night,' she said, 'came upon us, when we could go no further, and I was so weak that I could not take another step. There, poor soul, I had to bide, lying in the great forest under a great tree. It rained, and we crouched close under so as not to get wet. Forthwith I gathered wood, made a big fire, plucked moss, and made a resting-place for us. It was dark, and my sons said, "We must mind and not be eaten by wild beasts." And my elder son said to his brother, " I will think what must be done. You, too, have a couple of guns; if anything attacks us, you will shoot." But he said to his elder brother, "Do you, my brother, sleep first, and when you have had your sleep out, then you will watch again." 1 As they all slept under that great tree, he thought to himself, "I will sling my gun round my neck and climb a tree." He climbed a tree, reached its top, for he wondered whether he might not see something--a village or a town or a light. As it was, he did see a light. He took the hat from his head, and threw it in the direction of the light.'

Then she said, 'Ah! hostess, believe him not. Mark you, that is not true,' said his mother.

But she went and brought them beer, and said, 'Tell on.' And he said, 'I climbed down the tree to look where my hat was.'

'Ah! believe him not, hostess, believe him not; mark you, that is not true.'

'Nay, let him go on with his story. What was there?'

'Twenty-four robbers. There was a bright light that dazzled my eyes. Not far from them was a tree.' [At this point the story-teller forgot that the elder son is the narrator, so resumed the third person, repeating his former words almost verbatim till he came to the passage where the robbers send the lad into the castle.]

Then said the old mother to the hostess, 'Believe him not, believe him not, for that is not true which he tells you.'

'Let him proceed. What have you then done?' the hostess asked him.

'I--have done nothing.'

'You must have done something.'

'Well then, I have lain with you. I took away the ring; I took half the cloth of gold; a slipper I took from you--that I carried off. And I took me a sword, and went out, shut the door behind me. Then I went to where the robbers were, called to them to step through the hole one after another. As they came through the hole, I cut off each one's head, and flung him aside.'

Then the hostess saw it was true. 'Then you will be my man.'

And he drew the things out, and showed them to her. And they straightway embraced, and kissed one another. And she went into the little room, fetched the boy. 'See, that is your child; I am your wife.'

Forthwith she bids them harness two horses to the carriage; they drove to the castle. When they reached it, she said to her father, 'Father dear, see, I have soon found my husband.'

Forthwith they made a feast, invited everybody. Forthwith the banns were proclaimed, and they were married. The floor there was made of paper, and I came away here.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 5:48 pm
by SashaGallagher
THE THREE DRAGONS
A gentleman had three daughters. They went one day to a pond to bathe. There came a dragon, and carried them off. He hurried with them to a rocky cave. There they remained twelve years, without their father seeing them again or knowing where they were. There was a sly-boots called Bruntslikos. He went to the girls' father, and told him he would do his best to find his daughters. The father promised him one of them to wife, if he could find them. He took the road, and stayed seven years away; then he demanded a horse of the girls' father. He mounted it, and rode a whole year through the forest. At last he came to a tavern; two fellows there asked him where he was going to. He told them that he was going in search of three maidens.. They offered to go with him. 'Good,' he thought, 'three will make merrier company.'

As they went through the forest, the horse stamped his foot against the entrance to the dragon's cave, and pawed against it. Then Bruntslikos knew that those he was seeking were there. It was a great cavity in the rock. He left the two comrades on the brink above, and made them lower him by a rope to fetch up one of the maidens. He said he must fetch her at any cost. When he came down, she sat alone in the house; the dragon has gone to hunt hares.

When he came to her, she asked, 'How comest thou here, my beloved? Here must thou lose thy life.'

'I have no fear,' he answered.

'Never a bird comes flying here,' she said, but thou hast come.'

'I will see, though,' she thought, 'what sort of a hero he is,' and bade him brandish a sword; but he could not so much as raise it from the ground. But there was wine there. She made him drink thereof; straightway he felt himself stronger. And she bade him now lift the sword; he fell to so cutting and thrusting with it in the air that he now no more dreaded the dragon.

'Now I am strong,' he said, 'I will soon help thee out of here.'

'God grant thou may,' she said, 'then will I be thy bride.'

She gave him a golden ring, which she cut in half; the one half she gave to him, kept the other herself.

Then came the dragon home. When he still was fourteen miles off, he flung a hammer there, weighing nearly fifteen hundredweight. When he came, he said to his wife, 'I smell human flesh.'

She said, 'Dear husband, but how could that be? How could it get here? Hither comes never a bird. How could human flesh get here?'

'But I feel,' he said, 'that a man's here. Don't talk nonsense.' And he came nearer, and called, 'Brother-in-law!'

But Bruntslikos was hidden beneath a trough. After the dragon had called him thrice, he sprang out, faced him, and cried, 'What wilt thou of me? I fear thee not.'

The dragon answered, 'What need to tell me thou fearest me not? I will soon put thy strength to the test.'

Leaden dumplings were served up for the dragon's dinner, and he invited Bruntslikos to partake. 'I don't care for such dumplings,' said Bruntslikos, 'but give me wine to drink, and I'm your man.'

When they had drunk their fill, the dragon challenged Bruntslikos to wrestle with him; straightway he faced the dragon. The dragon drove him into the earth to the waist, then drew him out again. In the second bout Bruntslikos drove the dragon into the earth to the neck, then grasped the sword and began to cut off his heads (he had twelve). Bruntslikos struck them all off; only the middle one he could not sever. Then said the maiden, 'One smashing blow on it, and he will die at once.' So he killed him, and straight-way the dragon was turned to pitch. But he took all the tongues out of his heads, and put them in his pocket. Then he collected all the money that was there, put his bride in a basket and himself as well. And the two comrades had been waiting for him above, and, when he called, they drew him up with his bride. But when he was up with her, the two fellows began to quarrel over the maiden; she was so fair, they wanted her for wife.

But he said, 'There still remain two more maidens; of them you can take your choice.'

'I,' she said, 'will never desert Bruntslikos; he shall be my husband. We have plighted ourselves to all eternity, for he has saved my life.'

Then they went to seek the other dragon 1 in the cavern. He had fifteen heads, and was three times as strong as the first. The maiden whom this dragon had carried off showed Bruntslikos a sword, twice as heavy as the first. He could just move it, but not lift it clear off the earth. But she gave him wine to drink, and then he was straightway stronger. She too had greeted Bruntslikos, when he came, with the words, 'How comest thou here, my beloved? Here must thou lose thy life, for my husband will kill thee.'

But he said, 'To fetch thee am I come. Thy sister dear have I already fetched, and thee too I must help out of here.'

'God grant thou may,' she said, 'then would I be thy bride.'

'I have one already,' he said, 'thy sister; but all the more readily will I help thee out.'

Then came the dragon. He was still fifty miles away when he flung a hammer there weighing fifty hundred-weight. When he was come, he said, 'I smell human flesh here.'

'But, dear husband, how couldst thou smell human flesh? Never even a bird comes hither, and yet thou wilt be scenting a mortal.'

'Don't talk nonsense,' said he; and cried, 'Brother-in-law! Why comest thou not out? What is it thou wilt of me? I fear thee not.'

Thrice he thus called him, but he would not answer. But at last he said to him, 'I fear thee not. I must slay thee.'

'Come, if thou art so strong that thou wilt kill me,' answered the dragon, ' then let us wrestle.'

They wrestled, and the dragon drove him into the earth to the waist. They settled that the dragon should draw him out again. He seized the dragon, and drove him into the earth to the neck. Then he grasped the sword, and cut off his fifteen heads; only the middle one held so firm that he could not sever it.

But the princess told him, 'Just one blow right on the head, and he will die at once.'

When he had killed him, he plucked out all his tongues, and then had himself drawn up and the maiden. So now there were two sisters up, and now they went for the third. The third dragon had twenty-four heads. When Bruntslikos had served him like the other two, he helped the third maiden also out. But when the three maidens were out, his two comrades threw him into a well, for they wished not to give him the credit of that achievement, but rather themselves to vaunt at home that they had slain the dragons.

But Bruntslikos had covenanted with his bride that if he did not come within eight years, she should take a husband. So the eighth year came: she had chosen another man, and was celebrating the marriage. Then came Bruntslikos dressed like a beggar, so she knew him not, and felt no shame for her conduct. But he asked her for wine. When she gave him such, he threw as he drank that half of the ring into the glass, then offered it her. When she drank, her lips came against it. When she noticed it, she threw her half of the ring into the glass, and it straightway united with the other. Forthwith she fell to kissing him, for she recognised he was her lover. The marriage she straightway broke off, and plighted herself to him. When now he flung the dragons' tongues on the table, the gentlemen cried, 'Hurrah! That's it! that's the real thing!' at the sight of the tongues.

So, if they are not dead, they are living together.

TALE OF A FOOLISH BROTHER AND OF A WONDERFUL BUSH
THERE was once a poor peasant who had three sons, two of them wise and one foolish. One day the king gave a feast, to which everybody was invited, rich and poor. These two wise brothers set out for the feast like the rest, leaving the poor fool at home, crouching over the stove. He thereupon besought his mother to allow him to go after his brothers. But the mother answered, 'Fool that thou art! thy brothers go thither to tell tales, whilst thou, thou knowest nothing. What then couldst thou tell?' Still the fool continues to beg his mother to let him go, but still she refuses. 'Very well! if thou wilt not let me go there, with the help of God I shall know what to do.'

Well, one day the king contrived a certain tower. He then placed his daughter on' the second story, and issued a proclamation that whoever should kiss his daughter there should have her in marriage. Well, various princes and nobles hastened to the place; not one of them could reach her. The king then decreed that the peasants were to come. This order reached the house where dwelt the peasant who had three sons, two wise and one foolish. The two wise brothers arose and set out. The fool feigned to go in search of water, but he went to a bush and struck it three times with a stick. Whereupon a fairy appeared, who demanded, 'What wouldst thou?' 'I wish to have a horse of silver, garments of silver, and a sum of money.'

After he had received all these things, he set out on his way. Whom should he happen to overtake on the road but his two wise brothers.

'Whither are you going?' he asked of them.

'We are going to a king's palace--his who has contrived this tower, upon the second story of which he has placed his daughter; and he has proclaimed that whoever kisses her shall become her husband.'

The fool got off his horse, cut himself a cudgel, and began to beat his two brothers; finally he gave them each three ducats. The two brothers did not recognise him, and so he went on by himself, unknown. When he had come to the king's palace all the great lords looked with admiration at this prince, mounted on a silver steed, and clad in garments of silver. He leapt up with a great spring towards the princess, and almost got near enough to kiss her. He fell back again, and then, with the help of the good God, he took his departure. These noblemen then asked of one another, 'What is the meaning of this? He had scarcely arrived when he all but succeeded in kissing the princess.'

The fool then returned home, and went to the bush, and struck it thrice. The fairy again appeared, and asked of him, 'What is thy will?' He commanded her to hide his horse and his clothes. He took his buckets filled with water and went back into the house.

'Where hast thou been?' asked his mother of him.

'Mother, I have been outside, and I stripped myself, and (pardon me for saying so) I have been hunting lice in my shirt.'

'That is well,' said his mother, and she gave him some food. On the return of the two wise brothers their mother desired them to tell her what they had seen.

'Mother, we saw there a prince mounted on a silver steed, and himself clad in silver. He had overtaken us by the way, and asked us whither we were going. We told him the truth, that we were going to the palace of the king who had contrived this tower, on the second story of which he had placed his daughter, decreeing that whosoever should get near enough to give her a kiss should marry her. The prince dismounted, cut himself a cudgel, and gave us a sound beating, and then gave us each three ducats.'

The mother was very well pleased to get this money; for she was poor, and she could now buy herself something to eat.

Next day these two brothers again set out. The mother cried to her foolish son, 'Go and fetch me some water.' He went out to get the water, laid down his pails beside the well, and went to the bush; he struck it thrice, and the fairy appeared to him. 'What is thy will?'

'I wish to have a horse of gold and golden garments.'

The fairy brought him a horse of gold, golden garments, and a sum of money. Off he set, and once more he over-took his brothers on the road. This time he did not dismount, but, cudgel in hand, he charged upon his brothers, beat them severely, and gave them ten ducats apiece. He then betook himself to the king. The nobles gazed admiringly on him, seated on his horse of gold, himself attired in a golden garb. With a single bound he reached the second story, and gave the princess a kiss. Well, they wished to detain him, but he sprang away, and fled like the wind, with the help of the good God. He came back to his bush, out of which the fairy issued, and asked him, 'What wilt thou?'

'Hide my horse and my clothes.'

He dressed himself in his wretched clothes, and went into the house again.

'Where hast thou been?' asked his mother.

'I have been sitting in the sun, and (excuse me for saying it) I have been hunting lice in my shirt.'

She answered nothing, but gave him some food. He went and squatted down behind the stove in idiot fashion. The two wise brothers arrived. Their mother saw how severely they had been beaten, and she asked them, 'Who has mauled you so terribly?'

'It was that prince, mother.'

'And why have you not laid a complaint against him before the king?'

'But he gave us ten ducats apiece.'

'I will not send you any more to the king,' said the mother to them.

'Mother, they have posted sentinels all over the town to arrest him, the prince; for he has already kissed the king's daughter, after doing which he took to flight. Then the sentinels were posted. We are certain to catch this prince.'

The fool then said to them, 'How will you be able to seize him, since evidently he knows a trick or two?'

'Thou art a fool,' said the two wise brothers to him; 'we are bound to capture him.'

'Capture away, with the help of the good God,' replied the fool.

Three days later the two wise brothers set out, leaving the fool cowering behind the stove.

'Go and fetch some wood,' called his mother to him.

He roused himself and went, with the good God. He came to the bush, and struck it three times. The fairy issued out of it and asked, 'What dost thou demand?'

'I demand a horse of diamonds, garments of diamonds, and some money.'

He arrayed himself and set out. He overtook his two brothers, but this time he did not beat them; only he gave them each twenty ducats. He reached the king's city, and the nobles tried to seize him. He sprang up on to the second story, and for the second time he kissed the princess, who gave him her gold ring. Well, they wished to take him, but he said to them, 'If you had all the wit in the world you could not catch me.' But they were determined to seize him. He fled away like the wind. He came to the bush; he struck it thrice; the fairy issued from it and came to him, and took his horse and his clothes. He gathered some wood, and returned to the house; his mother is pleased with him and says, 'There, now! that is how thou shouldst always behave'; and she gave him something to eat. He went and crouched behind the stove. His two brothers arrived; the mother questioned them.

'Mother,' they answered, 'this prince could not be taken.'

'And has he not given you a beating?'

'No, mother; on the contrary, he gave us each twenty ducats more.'

'To-morrow,' said the mother, 'you shall not go there again.' And the two brothers answered, 'No, we will go there no more.'

Aha! so much the better.

This king gave yet another feast, and he decreed that 'All the princes, as many as there shall be of them, shall come to my palace so that my daughter may identify her husband among them.' This feast lasted four days, but the husband of the princess was not there. What did this king do? He ordained a third feast for beggars and poor country-folk, and he decreed that 'Every one come, be he blind or halt, let him not be ashamed, but come.' This feast lasted for a week, but the husband of the princess was not there. What then did the king do? He sent his servants with the order to go from house to house, and to bring to him the man upon whom should be found the princess's ring. 'Be he blind or halt, let him be brought to me,' said the king.

Well, the servants went from house to house for a week, and all who were found in each house they called together, in order to make the search. At last they came to this same house in which dwelt the fool. As soon as the fool saw them he went and lay down upon the stove. In came the king's servants, gathered the people of the house together, and asked the fool, 'What art thou doing there?'

'What does that matter to you?' replied the fool.

And his mother said to them, 'Sirs, he is a fool.'

'No matter,' said they, 'fool or blind, we gather together all whom we see, for so the king has commanded us.'

They make the fool come down from the stove; they look; the gold ring is on his finger.

'So, then, it is thou that art so clever.'

'It is I.'

He made ready and set out with them. He had nothing upon him, this fool, but a miserable shirt and a cloak all tattered and torn. He came to the king, to whom the servants said, 'Sire, we bring him to you.'

'Is this really he?'

'The very man.'

They show the ring.

'Well, this is he.'

The king commanded that sumptuous garments be made for him as quickly as possible. In these clothes he presented a very comely appearance. The king is well pleased; the wedding comes off; and they live happily, with the help of the good God.

Some time after, another king declared war against this one: 'Since thou hast not given thy daughter in marriage to my son, I will make war against thee.' But this king, the fool's father-in-law, had two sons. The fool also made preparations, and went to the war. His two brothers-in-law went in advance; the fool set out after them. He took a short cut, and, having placed himself on their line of march he sat down on the edge of a pond, and amused himself hunting frogs. These two wise brothers-in-law came up.

Just look at him, see what he is doing; he is not thinking of the war, but only amusing himself hunting frogs.'

These two brothers went on, and this fool mounted his horse, and went to his bush; he struck it thrice, and the fairy appeared before him.

What demandest thou?'

'I demand a magnificent horse and a sabre with which I may be able to exterminate the entire army, and some of the most beautiful clothes.'

He speedily dressed himself; he girded on this sabre; he mounted his horse, and set forth with the help of God. Having overtaken these two brothers-in-law by the way, he asked them, 'Whither are you bound?'

'We are going to the war.'

'So am I; let us all three go together.'

He reached the field of battle; he cut all his enemies to pieces; not a single one of them escaped.

He returned home, this fool, with his horse and all the rest; he hid his horse and his sabre and all the rest, so that nobody would know anything of them. These two brothers arrived after the fool had returned. The king asked them, Were you at the war, my children?'

'Yes, father, we were there, but thy son-in-law was not there.'

'And what was he about?'

'He! he was amusing himself hunting frogs; but a prince came and cut the whole army to pieces; not a soul of them has escaped.'

Then the king reproached his daughter thus: 'What, then, hast thou done to marry a husband who amuses himself catching frogs?'

'Is the fault mine, father? Even as God has given him to me, so will I keep him.'

The next day those two sons of the king did not go to the war, but the king himself went there with his son-in-law. But the fool mounted his horse the quickest and set out first; the king came after, not knowing where his son-in-law. had gone. The king arrived at the war, and found that his son-in-law had already cut to pieces the whole of the enemy's army. And therefore the other king said to this one that henceforth he would no more war against him. They shook hands with each other, these two kings. The fool was wounded in his great toe. His father-in-law noticed it, he tore his own handkerchief and dressed the wounded foot; and this handkerchief was marked with the king's name. The fool got home quickest, before his father-in-law; he pulled off his boots and lay down to sleep, for his foot pained him. The king came home, and his sons asked him, 'Father, was our brother-in-law at the war?'

'No, I saw nothing of him, he was not there; but a prince was there who has exterminated the whole army. Then this king and I shook hands in token that never more should there be war between us.'

Then his daughter said, 'My husband has my father's handkerchief round his foot.'

The king bounded forth; he looked at the handkerchief: it is his! it bears his name.

'So, then, it is thou who art so clever?'

'Yes, father, it is I.'

The king is very joyful; so are his sons and the queen, and the wife of this fool--all are filled with joy. Well, they made the wedding over again, and they lived together with the help of the good, golden God.

TALE OF A GIRL WHO WAS SOLD TO THE DEVIL AND OF HER BROTHER
Once upon a time there lived a countryman and his old wife; he had three daughters, but he was very poor. One day he and his young daughter went into the forest to gather mushrooms. And there he met with a great lord. The old peasant bared his head, and, frightened at the sight of the nobleman, said apologetically, 'I am not chopping your honour's wood with my hatchet, I am only gathering what is lying on the ground.'

'I would willingly give thee all this forest,' replies the nobleman; and he then asks the peasant if that is his wife who is with him.

'No, my lord, she is my daughter.'

'Wilt thou sell her to me?'

'Pray, my lord, do not mock and laugh at my daughter, since none but a great lady is a fitting match for your lordship.'

'That matters little to thee; all thou hast to do is to sell her to me.'

As the peasant did not name the price he asked for her, the nobleman give him two handfuls of ducats. The peasant, quite enraptured, grasped the money, but instead of going home to his wife, he went to a Jew's. He asked the Jew to give him something to eat and drink, but the Jew refused, being certain that he had no money to pay him with; however, as soon as the peasant had shown him the large sum that he had, the delighted Jew seated him at the table and gave him food and drink. He made the old peasant drunk, and stole away all his money. The peasant went home to his wife. She asked him where had he left his daughter?

'Wife, I have placed her in service with a great lord.'

The wife asked him if he had brought anything to her. He replied that he was himself hungry, but that this nobleman had said to him that he had taken one daughter, and that he would take the two others as well. His wife bade him take them away. He went away with these two daughters, and one of them he sold to another lord. This one gave him a hatful of money. Then the peasant said to his remaining daughter, 'Wait for me here in the forest; I will bring thee something to eat and drink; do not stray from here.' He went to the same Jew that had robbed him of his money. This Jew again stole from him the money he had received from the other lord. The peasant returned to his daughter, and brought her some bread, which she ate with delight. There came a third nobleman, who purchased this third girl.

'Do not go to the Jew,' said this lord to the peasant, 'but go straight home to thy wife, and hand over thy money to her, so that she may take charge of it; else this Jew will rob thee once more.'

The peasant went home to his wife, who was very glad.

This great lord spoke thus to him: 'There is in a forest a beautiful castle covered with silver. Go to the town, buy some fine horses and harness, engage some peasants to work, and rest thou thyself; make the peasants do the work.'

He got into a carriage; he took his peasants; and they set out with the help of God. They came, by a magnificent road, smooth as glass, into a great forest. They met a beggar, who asked this great lord (this peasant, once poor, now grown rich) where his daughters were.

Soon after these peasants discover that they are clean bewildered; they find themselves surrounded by deep ravines and insurmountable obstacles, so that they cannot get out, for they have lost their way.

There came an old beggar who asked them, 'Why do you tarry here? why are you not getting on?'

'Alas!' they answered, 'we cannot get out of this; we had a beautiful road, but we have lost it.'

'Whip up your horses a bit,' said the old man, 'perhaps they will go on.'

A lad touched up the horses, and all of a sudden the peasants see a magnificent road before them. They wish to thank this beggar, but he has vanished. The peasants fall to weeping, for, say they to themselves, 'This was no beggar; more likely was it the good God himself.' They reach the castle; the peasant is in ecstasies with it. The peasants work for him, and he and his wife take their ease.

Ten years rolled by. Once he had three daughters, whom he had already forgotten. 'The good God,' said he, 'gave me three daughters, but I have never yet had a son.'

One day the good God so ordered it that this peasant woman was brought to bed. She was delivered (pray excuse me) of a boy. This boy grew exceedingly; he was already three years old; he was very intelligent. When he was twelve years old his father put him to school. He was an apt scholar: he knew German, and could read anything.

One day this boy, having returned home, asked his father, 'How do you do, father?' His mother gave him some food, and sent him to bed. Next day he got up, and went to school. Two little boys who passed along said the one to the other, 'There goes the little boy whose father sold his daughters to the devils.' The boy reached the school filled with anger; he wrote his task quickly, for he could not calm his angry feelings. He went home to his father as quickly as possible; he took two pistols, and called on his father to come to him. As soon as his father came into the room, the boy locked the door on them both.

'Now, father, tell me the truth; had I ever any sisters? If you do not confess the truth to me, I will fire one of these pistols at you and the other at myself.'

The father answered, 'You had three sisters, my child, but I have sold them to I know not whom.'

He sent his father to the town, and bade him, 'Buy for me, father, an apple weighing one pound.'

The father came back home, and gave the apple to his son. The latter was delighted with it, and he made preparations for going out into the world. He embraced his father and mother. 'The good God be with you,' he said to them, 'for it may be I shall never see you more; perchance I may perish.'

He came to a field, where he saw two boys fighting terribly. The father of these two boys had, when dying, left to the one a cloak and to the other a saddle. The little boy went up to these boys and asked them, 'What are you fighting about?'

'Excuse us, my lord,' replied the younger, 'our parents are dead; they have left to one of us a cloak and to the other a saddle; my elder brother wants to take both cloak and saddle, and not to give me anything.'

This little nobleman said to them, 'Come now, I will put you right. Here is an apple which I will throw far out into this field; and whichever of you gets it first shall have both of these things.'

He flung away the apple, and while the boys were running to get it, this little nobleman purloined both cloak and saddle. He resumed his journey, and went away, with the help of God. He came to a field, he stopped, he examined the cloak he had just stolen, and to the saddle he cried, 'Bear me away to where my youngest sister lives.' The saddle took hold of him, lifted him into the air, and carried him to the dwelling of his youngest sister. He cried to his youngest sister, ' Let me in, sister.'

Her answer was, ' Twenty years have I been here, and have never seen anybody all that time; and you--you will break my slumber.'

'Sister, if you do not believe I am your brother, here is a handkerchief which will prove that I am.'

His sister read thereon the names of her father, her mother, and her brother. Then she let him enter, and fainted away. 'Where am I to hide you now, brother? for if my husband comes he will devour you.'

'Have no fear on my account,' he replied, 'I have a cloak which renders me invisible whenever I wear it.'

Her husband came home; she served some food to him; and then, employing a little artifice, ' Husband,' she said, 'I dreamt that I had a brother.'

'Very good.'

'If he were to come here, you would not harm him, would you, husband?'

'What harm should I do to him? I would give him something to eat and to drink.'

At this she called out, 'Brother, let my husband see you.'

The young lad's brother-in-law saw him, and was greatly pleased with his appearance; he gave him food and something to drink. He went out and called his brothers. They, well satisfied with the state of things, entered, along with the boy's two other sisters. The latter were brimming over with delight. A lovely lady also came, who enchanted him.

'Is this young lady married?' he asked his sister.

'No,' she replied, 'she has no husband; you can marry her if you like.'

They fell in love with each other; they were married.

Ten years they lived there. At last this youth said to his sister, 'I must return home to my father; perchance he is dead by now.'

He got up next morning; his brother-in-law gave him large sums of gold and silver.

They drew near to the house, he and his wife. Not far from this house was a small wood through which they had to pass, and in it they noticed a beautiful wand.

'Let us take this wand,' said his wife to him, 'it is very pretty; we will plant it at home.'

He obeyed her, and took the wand. He reached the house; the father was very happy that his son was now married.

Five years passed away. The good God gave them a son. He went to the town to invite the godfathers. After the christening they came back from church; they ate, they drank, and at last everybody went away; he remained alone with his wife. One day he went to the town. When he came home, he saw that his wife was no longer there, and that the sapling also had disappeared. (It was no sapling, but a demon.) He began to lament.

'Why do you lament?' asked his father.

'Do not anger me, father,' he said, 'for I am going out into the world.'

He got ready for the road; he set out. He came into a great forest. As it was beginning to rain, he took shelter under an oak; and in that very oak his wife was concealed. He slept for a little while; then he heard a child weeping.

'Who is this that is crying?' he asked of his wife.

'It is your child.'

And he recognised her and cried, 'Wife, hearken to what I am going to say to you. Ask this dragon of yours where it is that he hides the key of his house.'

'Very well,' she assented.

The dragon came home; she flung her arms round his neck and said to him, 'Husband, tell me truly, where is the key of our house?'

What good would it do you if I told you?' he replied. 'Well, then, listen. In a certain forest there is a great cask; inside this cask there is a cow; in this cow there is a calf; in this calf a goose; in this goose a duck; in this duck an egg; and it is inside this egg that the key is to be found.'

'Very good; that is one secret I know.'

She then asked him wherein lay his strength.

The dragon owned this to his wife: 'When I am dressed as a lord, I cannot be killed; neither could any one kill me when I am dressed as a king; but it is only at the moment I am putting on my boots that I can be killed.'

'Very good; now I know both these secrets.'

He smelt at his feather, and all his three brothers-in-law appeared beside him. They lay in wait till the moment when the dragon was drawing on his boots, and then they slew him. They betook themselves to that forest, they smashed the cask, they killed the cow that was inside it, they killed the goose that was inside the calf, then the duck that was inside the goose; they broke open the egg, and out of it they drew the key. He took this key, he came back to where his wife was, he opened the oak, and he let his wife out.

'Now, my brothers-in-law, the good God be with you. As for me, I am setting out to follow my way of happiness; now I shall no more encounter any evil thing.'

He returned with his wife to his father's house. His father was very glad to see him come back with his wife; he gave them something to eat and drink, and he said to his son, 'Hearken to me now, my child. We are old now, I and my wife; thou must stay beside me.'

And he answered him, 'It is well, my father; if thou sendest me not away, I will dwell with thee.'

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:41 pm
by SashaGallagher
THE FIVE TRADES
Once there were a sailor and other four men. One was a smith, and the other was a soldier and a tailor, and the last was an innkeeper. The sailor asked the smith to come upon the sea. The smith said, 'No, I must go and do some work.' 'What is your work?' 'To heat iron,' says the smith, and make it into shoes for horses.' The sailor asked the other three to come on board his ship. The soldier said he must go to make facings and marchings; and the tailor said, 'I must go and make clothes to keep you warm.' And the innkeeper said, 'I am going to make beer to make you drunk, that you may all of you go to the devil.' That's all of that.

TWO-PENCE HALF-PENNY
There were three brothers. The three were going on the road to seek for work. Night came upon them. They knew not where to go to get lodgings: it was night. They were travelling through a wood on an old road. They saw a small light, and they came to a cottage. They were hungry and tired. The door was open. They saw a table with food upon it.

Said the eldest brother, 'Go you in.'

'I am not going in; go in yourself.'

'Not I, indeed.'

'You are two fools,' said Jack. And in he went, and sat down at the table, and ate his bellyful. The other two watched him. They were afraid to enter the house. At last the other two went in, and sat down and ate.

Now a little old woman comes. Said the old woman, 'I have seen no man here for many years. Whence came ye hither?'

'We are seeking for work.'

'I will find work for you to-morrow.'

They went to bed. Up they rose in the morning. And there was a great pot on the fire, and porridge and milk. That was the food they ate. Now the old woman tells the eldest brother to go into the barn to get the tools, and to go into the wood to fell the trees. He took off his coat. There he is doing the work. There came an old dwarf, and asked him who told him to fell the wood. He could not see this little man, so small was he. He looked under his feet; he saw him in the stubble. The old dwarf hit him and beat him, until he bled, and there he left him. Now the maid comes with his dinner. The girl went home and told the two other brothers to come and carry him home and put him to bed.

In the morning the second brother goes to the wood.

The eldest brother told him it was a little man who beat him, and the second brother laughed at him. He went off now down to the woods. Here is something that asks him who told him to fell the trees. He looked around him; he could see nothing. At last he saw him in the stubble. 'Be off,' said he. The little stranger knocked him to pieces. The little maid came down to him with his dinner, and went home and told the two brothers to come and carry him home. The two brothers went down and brought him home.

Jack laughed at them: 'I am going down to-morrow myself.'

In the morning he went down to the wood. Here he is felling the trees. He heard something. He looked beneath his feet. He saw the little man in the stubble. Jack kicked him.

'You had better keep quiet,' said the little man.

The dwarf hit him. Down went Jack, and the dwarf half-killed him. There was Jack lying there now. The maid came with his dinner. Home went the maid, and told the two brothers to come and carry him home.

'No,' said Jack, 'leave me here and go.'

The two brothers went home. Jack was watching him, and the little man crept under a great stone. Up got Jack now, and home he went, and told his two brothers to go into the stable and get out four horses. They took a strong rope, and the three went with the horses and fastened the rope round the stone. They took the horses, and pulled it up, and found a well there.

'Go you down,' said one.

'Not I,' said the other; 'I am not going down.'

'I will go down,' says Jack. 'Fasten this rope and let me down, and when you hear me say "Pull up," pull me up; and when I say "Let go," let me go.'

Now the two brothers fastened him and let him down. Down he went a very little way. The little man beat him. 'Pull me up.' He goes down again. He forgets the word: 'Let me down.' He came into a beautiful country, and there he saw the old dwarf. The old dwarf spoke to him: 'Since you have come into this country, Jack, I will tell you something now.' The old man tells Jack what he is to do. 'You will find three castles. In the first one lives a giant with two heads, and,' said the old dwarf, 'you must fight him. Take the old rusty sword. I will be there with you.'

'I am afraid of him.'

'Go on, and have no fear. I will be there with you.'

Here is Jack at the castle now. He knocked at the door.

The servant-maid came, and he asked for her master.

'He is at home. Do you wish to see him?'

'Yes,' said Jack, 'I want to fight with him.'

The maid went and told him to come out.

'Are you wanting something to eat?'

'No,' said Jack, 'come out, and I will fight with you.'

'Come here and choose your sword.' (Jack chose the old rusty sword.) 'Why do you take that old rusty sword? Take a bright one.'

'Not I. This one will do for me.'

The twain went out before the door. Off went one head. 'Spare my life, Jack. I will give you all my money.'

'No.'

He struck off the other head; he killed him. (Now this was the Copper Castle: so they called it.)

Now Jack goes on to the next, the Silver Castle. A giant with three heads lived there. Jack chose the rusty sword, and struck two heads off.

'Don't kill me, Jack; let me live. I will give you the keys of my castle.'

'Not I,' said Jack; and off went the other head.

Now Jack goes on to the next, the Golden Castle. And there was a giant with four heads.

'Have you come here to fight with me?'

'Yes,' says Jack.

The giant told him to choose a sword, and he chose the old rusty sword; and out they went. Jack struck off three heads.

'Don't kill me, Jack. I will give you my keys.'

'Yes, I will,' said Jack; and off went the other head.

Now all the castles, and the money and the three fair ladies in the three castles, were his. Off Jack goes now and the lady with him. He goes back to the Silver Castle, and takes that lady. He goes to the Copper Castle, and takes that lady. And the four went on and came to the place where Jack descended. The old dwarf was there waiting for him. Jack sent the three ladies up to his brothers. Now the old dwarf wanted meat. Jack went back to the castle, and cooked some meat for him. The old dwarf carried Jack up a bit; the old dwarf stopped; he wanted meat. Jack gave him meat. He went up a bit further; he stopped; he wanted meat. Jack gave him meat. He went up a bit higher. He wanted meat. Jack had none. Now he was a very little way from the surface. He knew not what to do. He drew his knife from his pocket, and cut a little meat off his leg, and gave it to the old dwarf. Up went Jack.

Two of the ladies and his two brothers had gone off. And the eldest brother had taken the fairest lady; and the second brother had taken the other lady; and they had left the ugly lady for Jack. Jack asked her where they had gone. The lady told him; and he hastened after them. He caught them by the church: they were going to be married. The fairest lady looked back, and saw Jack.

'That one's mine,' said Jack.

Jack took and married her. He left the other lady for his eldest brother to marry. There was only the second brother now, and he took the ugly lady. There are the three brothers and the three ladies.

Now they want to go down to the three castles. Jack told the old dwarf to carry them down.

'I will carry you down; you must give me food as I come down.'

'Yes,' said Jack, 'I will give you plenty of food.'

'I will take you down.'

He carried them all down. And the old dwarf went along with Jack. Jack put one brother and one lady in the Copper Castle, and the other brother in the Silver Castle; and Jack went to the Golden Castle. And Jack kept the old dwarf all his days. The old dwarf died, and at last Jack grew old himself.

THE OLD SMITH
An old smith lived on a hill with his wife and mother-in-law. He could only make ploughshares. A boy comes, and wants his horse shod. The smith could not do it. The boy cuts the horse's legs off, stops the blood, and puts the legs on the fire, beats them on the anvil, and replaces them on the horse. He gives the smith a guinea, and goes away. The smith tries this with his mother-in-law's horse, but bungles it: the horse bleeds to death, and its legs are burnt to ashes. The boy comes again with two old women. 'I want you to make them young again.' The smith couldn't. The boy puts them on the fire, beats them on the anvil, and rejuvenates them. The smith tries it with his wife and mother-in-law, but burns them to ashes. He leaves his forge, and sets off in the snow and wind. The barefooted boy follows him. The smith wants to send him off. The boy tells him of a sick king in the next town, whom they will cure, the boy acting as the smith's servant. The butler admits them, and gives them plenty to eat and drink. The smith forgets all about the sick king, but the boy reminds him. They go up. The boy asks for a knife, pot, water, and spoon. He cuts the king's head off, and spits on his hand to stop the blood. He puts the head in the pot, boils it, lifts it out with the golden spoon, and replaces it on the king, who is cured. The king gives them a sack of gold.

They take the road again.

'All I want,' says Barefoot, 'is a pair of shoes.'

'I've little enough for myself,' says the smith.

The boy leaves him, and the smith goes on alone. Hearing of another sick king, he goes to cure him, but takes too much to drink, and boils his head all to ribbons, and lets him bleed to death. A knock comes to the door. The smith, frightened, refuses admittance.

'Won't you open to little Barefoot?'

The boy enters, and with much difficulty gets the head on again. The king is cured, and gives them two sacks of gold. The boy asks for shoes and gets them. The boy tells the smith of a gentleman who has a wizard, 1 whom none can beat: 'Let's go there. Three sacks of gold to any one who beats him.' They enter. There was a bellows. The wizard blows, and blows up half the sea; the boy blows up a fish that drinks up all the wizard's water. The wizard blows up corn as it were rain; the boy blows up birds that eat the corn. The wizard blows up hundreds of rabbits; the boy blows up greyhounds that catch the rabbits. So they win the three sacks of gold. The smith hardly knows what to do with all his money. He builds a village and three taverns, and spends his time loafing round. An old woman comes and begs a night's lodging. He gives it her. She gives him three wishes. He wishes that whoever takes his hammer in his hand can't put it down again, that whoever sits on his chair can't get up again, and that whoever gets in his pocket can't get out again. One day, when money had run low, a man comes to the smith and asks will he sell himself. The smith sells himself for a bag of gold, the time to be up in five years. After five years the man returns. The smith gives him his hammer to hold, and goes off to his tavern. From inn to inn the man follows him, and, finding him in the third inn, gives him five more years' freedom. The same thing happens with the chair; and the smith gets five more years from the old man (now called Beng, devil). The third time the devil finds the smith in one of his taverns. The smith explains that he has called for drinks, and asks the devil to change himself into a sovereign in his (the smith's) pocket to pay for them. The devil does so. The smith returns home, and goes to bed. At night he hears a great uproar in his trousers pocket, gets up, puts them on the anvil, and hammers. The devil promises never to meddle with him in future if he will release him. The smith lets him go. Afterwards the smith dies, and goes to the devil's door and knocks. An imp of Satan comes out. Tell your father the smith is here.'

The little devil went and told his father.

'He will kill us all,' said the devil, 'if we let him in. Here, take this wisp of straw, and light him upstairs to God.'

The little devil did so. The smith went to heaven. There he sat and played the harp. And there we shall all see him one day unless we go to the devil instead.

Cf. Ralston's 'The Smith and the Demon,' p. 57, and 'The Pope with the Greedy Eyes,' p. 351; Dasent's 'The Master-Smith' (Tales from the Norse, p. 106); Clouston, ii. 409; a curious Negro version from Virginia, 'De New Han’,' plainly derived from a European source, which I published in the Athenæum for 10th August 1887, p. 215, and give here as an appendix; Reinhold Köhler's essay, 'Sanct Petrus, der Himmelspförtner' (Aufsätze über Märchen and Volkslieder, pp. 48-78); 'L’Anneau de Bronze' in Carnoy and Nicolaides' Traditions Populaires de l’Asie Mineure, p. 62; and Grimm's 'Brother Lustig,' No. 81 (i. 312, 440). With the last compare this sketch of a story, which M. Paul Bataillard got from Catalonian Gypsies encamped near Paris in 1869, and which very closely resembles one of the Cento Novelle Antiche, summarised by Crane (Italian Popular Tales, p. 360).

St. Peter travels with Christ as his servant, and they are often hard put to it for a livelihood. Christ sends St. Peter to find a sheep, and, bidding him cook it, goes to heal a sick person, who rewards him richly. Peter eats the sheep's liver and kidneys, and Christ, when he comes back, asks where the liver and kidneys are, 'for Jesus, who is God, knows everything.' Peter replying that the sheep had none, at the end of their meal Christ divides into three heaps the large sum received from the farmer whom he has healed. 'For whom are these three heaps?' asks Peter. 'The two first for each of us,' Christ answers, 'and the third for him who ate the liver and kidneys.' 'That was me,' says Peter. 'Very well,' Christ answers, 'take my share as well. I return to my own.' And then it is that Christ takes the cross, etc. 'You see,' the narrator ended, 'that it was God Jesus who at the beginning of the world founded all the estates of men--first doctors, for he healed for money--and who taught the Gypsies to beg and to go barefoot, whilst St. Peter instructed them how to deceive their like.'

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:52 pm
by SashaGallagher
THE FIVE TRADES
Once there were a sailor and other four men. One was a smith, and the other was a soldier and a tailor, and the last was an innkeeper. The sailor asked the smith to come upon the sea. The smith said, 'No, I must go and do some work.' 'What is your work?' 'To heat iron,' says the smith, and make it into shoes for horses.' The sailor asked the other three to come on board his ship. The soldier said he must go to make facings and marchings; and the tailor said, 'I must go and make clothes to keep you warm.' And the innkeeper said, 'I am going to make beer to make you drunk, that you may all of you go to the devil.' That's all of that.

TWO-PENCE HALF-PENNY
There were three brothers. The three were going on the road to seek for work. Night came upon them. They knew not where to go to get lodgings: it was night. They were travelling through a wood on an old road. They saw a small light, and they came to a cottage. They were hungry and tired. The door was open. They saw a table with food upon it.

Said the eldest brother, 'Go you in.'

'I am not going in; go in yourself.'

'Not I, indeed.'

'You are two fools,' said Jack. And in he went, and sat down at the table, and ate his bellyful. The other two watched him. They were afraid to enter the house. At last the other two went in, and sat down and ate.

Now a little old woman comes. Said the old woman, 'I have seen no man here for many years. Whence came ye hither?'

'We are seeking for work.'

'I will find work for you to-morrow.'

They went to bed. Up they rose in the morning. And there was a great pot on the fire, and porridge and milk. That was the food they ate. Now the old woman tells the eldest brother to go into the barn to get the tools, and to go into the wood to fell the trees. He took off his coat. There he is doing the work. There came an old dwarf, and asked him who told him to fell the wood. He could not see this little man, so small was he. He looked under his feet; he saw him in the stubble. The old dwarf hit him and beat him, until he bled, and there he left him. Now the maid comes with his dinner. The girl went home and told the two other brothers to come and carry him home and put him to bed.

In the morning the second brother goes to the wood.

The eldest brother told him it was a little man who beat him, and the second brother laughed at him. He went off now down to the woods. Here is something that asks him who told him to fell the trees. He looked around him; he could see nothing. At last he saw him in the stubble. 'Be off,' said he. The little stranger knocked him to pieces. The little maid came down to him with his dinner, and went home and told the two brothers to come and carry him home. The two brothers went down and brought him home.

Jack laughed at them: 'I am going down to-morrow myself.'

In the morning he went down to the wood. Here he is felling the trees. He heard something. He looked beneath his feet. He saw the little man in the stubble. Jack kicked him.

'You had better keep quiet,' said the little man.

The dwarf hit him. Down went Jack, and the dwarf half-killed him. There was Jack lying there now. The maid came with his dinner. Home went the maid, and told the two brothers to come and carry him home.

'No,' said Jack, 'leave me here and go.'

The two brothers went home. Jack was watching him, and the little man crept under a great stone. Up got Jack now, and home he went, and told his two brothers to go into the stable and get out four horses. They took a strong rope, and the three went with the horses and fastened the rope round the stone. They took the horses, and pulled it up, and found a well there.

'Go you down,' said one.

'Not I,' said the other; 'I am not going down.'

'I will go down,' says Jack. 'Fasten this rope and let me down, and when you hear me say "Pull up," pull me up; and when I say "Let go," let me go.'

Now the two brothers fastened him and let him down. Down he went a very little way. The little man beat him. 'Pull me up.' He goes down again. He forgets the word: 'Let me down.' He came into a beautiful country, and there he saw the old dwarf. The old dwarf spoke to him: 'Since you have come into this country, Jack, I will tell you something now.' The old man tells Jack what he is to do. 'You will find three castles. In the first one lives a giant with two heads, and,' said the old dwarf, 'you must fight him. Take the old rusty sword. I will be there with you.'

'I am afraid of him.'

'Go on, and have no fear. I will be there with you.'

Here is Jack at the castle now. He knocked at the door.

The servant-maid came, and he asked for her master.

'He is at home. Do you wish to see him?'

'Yes,' said Jack, 'I want to fight with him.'

The maid went and told him to come out.

'Are you wanting something to eat?'

'No,' said Jack, 'come out, and I will fight with you.'

'Come here and choose your sword.' (Jack chose the old rusty sword.) 'Why do you take that old rusty sword? Take a bright one.'

'Not I. This one will do for me.'

The twain went out before the door. Off went one head. 'Spare my life, Jack. I will give you all my money.'

'No.'

He struck off the other head; he killed him. (Now this was the Copper Castle: so they called it.)

Now Jack goes on to the next, the Silver Castle. A giant with three heads lived there. Jack chose the rusty sword, and struck two heads off.

'Don't kill me, Jack; let me live. I will give you the keys of my castle.'

'Not I,' said Jack; and off went the other head.

Now Jack goes on to the next, the Golden Castle. And there was a giant with four heads.

'Have you come here to fight with me?'

'Yes,' says Jack.

The giant told him to choose a sword, and he chose the old rusty sword; and out they went. Jack struck off three heads.

'Don't kill me, Jack. I will give you my keys.'

'Yes, I will,' said Jack; and off went the other head.

Now all the castles, and the money and the three fair ladies in the three castles, were his. Off Jack goes now and the lady with him. He goes back to the Silver Castle, and takes that lady. He goes to the Copper Castle, and takes that lady. And the four went on and came to the place where Jack descended. The old dwarf was there waiting for him. Jack sent the three ladies up to his brothers. Now the old dwarf wanted meat. Jack went back to the castle, and cooked some meat for him. The old dwarf carried Jack up a bit; the old dwarf stopped; he wanted meat. Jack gave him meat. He went up a bit further; he stopped; he wanted meat. Jack gave him meat. He went up a bit higher. He wanted meat. Jack had none. Now he was a very little way from the surface. He knew not what to do. He drew his knife from his pocket, and cut a little meat off his leg, and gave it to the old dwarf. Up went Jack.

Two of the ladies and his two brothers had gone off. And the eldest brother had taken the fairest lady; and the second brother had taken the other lady; and they had left the ugly lady for Jack. Jack asked her where they had gone. The lady told him; and he hastened after them. He caught them by the church: they were going to be married. The fairest lady looked back, and saw Jack.

'That one's mine,' said Jack.

Jack took and married her. He left the other lady for his eldest brother to marry. There was only the second brother now, and he took the ugly lady. There are the three brothers and the three ladies.

Now they want to go down to the three castles. Jack told the old dwarf to carry them down.

'I will carry you down; you must give me food as I come down.'

'Yes,' said Jack, 'I will give you plenty of food.'

'I will take you down.'

He carried them all down. And the old dwarf went along with Jack. Jack put one brother and one lady in the Copper Castle, and the other brother in the Silver Castle; and Jack went to the Golden Castle. And Jack kept the old dwarf all his days. The old dwarf died, and at last Jack grew old himself.

THE OLD SMITH
An old smith lived on a hill with his wife and mother-in-law. He could only make ploughshares. A boy comes, and wants his horse shod. The smith could not do it. The boy cuts the horse's legs off, stops the blood, and puts the legs on the fire, beats them on the anvil, and replaces them on the horse. He gives the smith a guinea, and goes away. The smith tries this with his mother-in-law's horse, but bungles it: the horse bleeds to death, and its legs are burnt to ashes. The boy comes again with two old women. 'I want you to make them young again.' The smith couldn't. The boy puts them on the fire, beats them on the anvil, and rejuvenates them. The smith tries it with his wife and mother-in-law, but burns them to ashes. He leaves his forge, and sets off in the snow and wind. The barefooted boy follows him. The smith wants to send him off. The boy tells him of a sick king in the next town, whom they will cure, the boy acting as the smith's servant. The butler admits them, and gives them plenty to eat and drink. The smith forgets all about the sick king, but the boy reminds him. They go up. The boy asks for a knife, pot, water, and spoon. He cuts the king's head off, and spits on his hand to stop the blood. He puts the head in the pot, boils it, lifts it out with the golden spoon, and replaces it on the king, who is cured. The king gives them a sack of gold.

They take the road again.

'All I want,' says Barefoot, 'is a pair of shoes.'

'I've little enough for myself,' says the smith.

The boy leaves him, and the smith goes on alone. Hearing of another sick king, he goes to cure him, but takes too much to drink, and boils his head all to ribbons, and lets him bleed to death. A knock comes to the door. The smith, frightened, refuses admittance.

'Won't you open to little Barefoot?'

The boy enters, and with much difficulty gets the head on again. The king is cured, and gives them two sacks of gold. The boy asks for shoes and gets them. The boy tells the smith of a gentleman who has a wizard, 1 whom none can beat: 'Let's go there. Three sacks of gold to any one who beats him.' They enter. There was a bellows. The wizard blows, and blows up half the sea; the boy blows up a fish that drinks up all the wizard's water. The wizard blows up corn as it were rain; the boy blows up birds that eat the corn. The wizard blows up hundreds of rabbits; the boy blows up greyhounds that catch the rabbits. So they win the three sacks of gold. The smith hardly knows what to do with all his money. He builds a village and three taverns, and spends his time loafing round. An old woman comes and begs a night's lodging. He gives it her. She gives him three wishes. He wishes that whoever takes his hammer in his hand can't put it down again, that whoever sits on his chair can't get up again, and that whoever gets in his pocket can't get out again. One day, when money had run low, a man comes to the smith and asks will he sell himself. The smith sells himself for a bag of gold, the time to be up in five years. After five years the man returns. The smith gives him his hammer to hold, and goes off to his tavern. From inn to inn the man follows him, and, finding him in the third inn, gives him five more years' freedom. The same thing happens with the chair; and the smith gets five more years from the old man (now called Beng, devil). The third time the devil finds the smith in one of his taverns. The smith explains that he has called for drinks, and asks the devil to change himself into a sovereign in his (the smith's) pocket to pay for them. The devil does so. The smith returns home, and goes to bed. At night he hears a great uproar in his trousers pocket, gets up, puts them on the anvil, and hammers. The devil promises never to meddle with him in future if he will release him. The smith lets him go. Afterwards the smith dies, and goes to the devil's door and knocks. An imp of Satan comes out. Tell your father the smith is here.'

The little devil went and told his father.

'He will kill us all,' said the devil, 'if we let him in. Here, take this wisp of straw, and light him upstairs to God.'

The little devil did so. The smith went to heaven. There he sat and played the harp. And there we shall all see him one day unless we go to the devil instead.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:14 am
by SashaGallagher
THE OLD SOLDIER
There was a very old soldier; he was twelve years in military service. Then the colonel asked him, 'My good man, what do you want for having served me so many years here? Whatever you want I will give you, for you have served me well so many years. I will give you a beautiful white horse, and I will give you three big tobacco-pipes, so that you'll smoke like a gentleman. I will give you three rolls for your journey. The whole company never served as well as you have served me. I left everything to you; you have performed every sentry.'

'If I went home on furlough, I should weep bitterly. How can I leave you, my good comrades? Now I go home, shall never see you more; I have none but my God and good comrades. I was a good soldier, the sergeant over the entire company. The major has given me a beautiful white horse to go home on. O God, I am going; but I have not much money, only a little.'

When he had come into great forests, there came a beggar and begs of the soldier. He said to him, did the soldier, 'O God! what can I give you? I am, you see, a poor soldier, and I have far to go, yet my heart is not heavy. But, wait a bit, O beggar, I will give you a roll.' Then he bade him farewell.

Afterwards the same beggar came again to the soldier, and begs of him, 'O my soldier, give me something, make me a present.'

'How can I make you a present, seeing I have given already to four beggars? But wait, here I'll give you these couple of kreutzers, to get a drink of brandy with.'

Well, he went further. Again a third beggar met him; again .he begs of him. 'My God!' he said to him, 'I am a poor soldier; I have no one but God and myself. I shall have no money; I shall have nothing for myself; I'm giving you everything. My God! what am I to do? I'm an old soldier, a poor man; and, being so poor, where shall I now get anything? I gave you everything--bread, money, and my white horse. Now I must tramp on alone on my old legs. No one ever will know that I was a soldier. But my Golden God be with you, farewell.'

Then the beggar said to the soldier, 'Old soldier, I permit you to ask whatever you will. For I am God.'

The soldier answered, 'I want nothing but a stick that when I say "Beat" will beat every one and fear nobody.'

God gave it him. 'Tell me now what do you want besides.'

'Give me further a sack that if I say to a man "Get in" he must forthwith get into it.'

'Good, but you still may ask for a third gift. Only think well, so that God in your old days may succour you.'

'I want nothing but a sack that will let fall money when shaken.'

God gave him that too, and went off. The old soldier goes further, comes to a city, comes into an inn. There were many country-folk and other people of all sorts. He sits down to table, and orders victuals and drink. Straight-way the gentleman brought him something to eat. When he had eaten and drunk, he asks him to pay. He takes the sack, shakes it; golden pieces come tumbling out. He paid them all to the gentleman, and went away. The gentleman was right glad that he had given him all that money.

He goes further, came into a vast forest. There were four-and-twenty robbers; they kept an inn there, and sold what one required. He went in, and orders victuals to eat and brandy to drink; forthwith they brought him brandy strong as iron. He drank; he got drunk. 'Now pay.' He takes the sack, and shook out golden pieces, and hands them over. He paid the robbers, 'but he did not know that they were robbers. When he had paid up, they marvel to see him shake a sack like that and the money come falling out. They took him, take the sack, and go into another room. There four of them held him down, whilst two shake the sack; the money came tumbling out to their hearts' desire. They told their chief, seize the soldier, and kill him, and cut him in pieces; then they hung up his body like an ox on a peg. Let us leave them and come to the soldier. When he got to paradise, my Golden God let him be, but not long. 'Do you, Peter, go to that old soldier, and ask him what he wants here.' Good, Peter came. 'What are you wanting?' 'I just want the peace of God.' 'Hah! I'll ask God if he will let you stay here.' Peter went to my God and asks him, 'God, that old soldier is wanting your peace.' 'Go to the devils; tell them all to lay hold of him, tear him in pieces, and put as much wood as possible beneath the pot, so as to roast him thoroughly.' Well, they cooked him to shreds; but after all had to chuck him out, for he knocked them about so that he broke their bones. A second time my God sent Death for him, and him too the old soldier thrashed. But now he is dead and rotten, and we are alive.

THE DRAGON
A lord, his wife, and his daughter live at a great castle. A poor lad is engaged to mind the sheep. The daughter gives him bread and beer in a basket for lunch. The old lord explains that previous servants have always come back with one cow short. In the field a little man comes to Jack. Jack gives him as much as he can eat; and the little man gives Jack a plum. The little man explains that a giant in a neighbouring castle steals a cow daily. He gives Jack a pennyworth of pins, and bids him put them in the giant's drink. Jack goes to the giant, and asks for work. The giant goes to get drinks, and Jack mixes up the pins in the giant's glass. The giant drinks, falls ill, and dies. Jack tells the little man how he has fared, and returns with the full tale of cows. The master is surprised. Presently his daughter comes in. She tells Jack that to-morrow she is to be killed by a dragon, and would like him to be there to see. Jack refuses, but gives the girl a plum, which she eats.

Next morning she gives him his food, and off he goes. He shares it as before with the little man, who bids him take a key, unlock a large door, and take out a black horse and black clothes, with a sword he will find there. Then, having watered his horse, he is to go and fight the dragon. He goes, and knocks the dragon about with his sword. The dragon shoots fire from his mouth, but the horse throws up the water he has drunk, and quenches it. Jack puts back the horse, changes his clothes, and goes home with the cows. He gives another plum to the girl, who has to meet the dragon again next day, and asks Jack to be there. He refuses. Next morning she gives Jack his food, and Jack at the little man's suggestion asks for more. He gets it, goes, and shares it with the little man. It is the same as before, only this time he gets a white horse and white clothes. The little man tells Jack that to-morrow is the last day of the fight, and bids him rise early, and ask the young lady to send more food. Jack gives her another plum. This time she prepares the food over-night, as she has to meet the dragon at daybreak. She wants Jack to come and see, but he refuses--'must see after the cows.' He gets a red horse and red clothes this time, and the horse drinks the water dry. The fire from the dragon burns the lady's hair, but the horse's flood of water quenches it; and between them they kill the dragon. The lady cuts off a lock of Jack's hair with a golden scissors. He returns to the castle, and there the girl tells him about the fight and gets another plum. Then there is the usual dinner. Every guest has to lay his head in the lady's lap to let her see whether the lock matches, Jack having meanwhile gone off as usual with his cows, and shared his food with the little man. They fail to match the hair, so they bring up the servants--Jack last of all, wearing the red clothes underneath his own rags. He marries the young lady, and they live first in the dead giant's castle, and then, the parents having died, in her father's.

THE GREEN MAN OF NO-MAN'S LAND
There was a young miller, who was a great gambler. Nobody could beat him. One day a man comes and challenges him. They play. Jack wins and demands a castle. There it is. They play again, and Jack loses. The man tells Jack his name is the Green Man of Noman's Land, and that unless Jack finds his castle in a year and a day he will be beheaded. The time goes by. Jack remembers his task, and sets out in cold and snow. He comes to a cottage, where an old woman gives him food and lodging. He asks her if she knows the Green Man. 'No,' she says; 'but if a quarter of the world knows I can tell you.' In the morning she mounts on the roof and blows a horn. A quarter of all the men in the world came. She asks them. They do not know the Green Man, and she dismisses them. Again she blows the horn, and the birds come. She asks them; they don't know; and she dismisses them. She sends Jack on to her elder sister, who knows more than she does. She lends Jack her horse, and gives him a ball of thread to place between the horse's ears. He comes to the second sister's house. 'It is long,' she says, 'since I saw my sister's horse.' He eats and sleeps, then asks about the Green Man. She knows not, but will tell him if half the world knows; so goes on the roof and blows a horn. Half the world come, but they do not know the Green Man. 'Go,' she says, and blows the horn again. Half the birds in the world come, but with a like result. She takes her sister's horse, and gives Jack hers, with a ball of thread, and sends him on to the eldest sister. It is the same thing there. The third sister also doesn't know, but in the morning goes on the roof and blows a horn. All the people in the world come, but do not know the Green Man. 'Go.' Again she blows, and all the birds come, but do not know. She goes down and looks in her book, and finds that the eagle is missing. She blows again; the eagle comes; and she abuses him. He explains that he has just come from the Green Man of Noman's Land. She lends Jack her horse, and bids him go till he comes to a pool and sees three white birds, to hide, and to steal the feathers of the last one to enter the water. He does so. The bird cries and demands its feathers. Jack insists on her carrying him over to her father's castle. She denies at first that she is the Green Man's daughter, but at last carries him over, and when across becomes a young lady. Jack goes up to the castle and knocks. The Green Man comes out: 'So you've found the house, Jack.' 'Yes.' The Green Man sets him tasks, the loss of his head the penalty of failure. The first task is to clean the stable. As fast as he throws out a shovelful of dirt, three return. So Jack gives it up, and the girl, coming with his dinner, does it for him. The Green Man accuses him of receiving help; he denies it. The second task is to fell a forest before mid-day. Jack cuts down three trees and weeps. The girl brings his dinner, and does it for him, warning him not to tell her father. The same accusation is met with the same denial. The third task is to thatch a barn with a single feather only of each bird. Jack catches a robin, pulls a feather from it, lets it go then, and sits down despairing. The girl brings his food, and performs his task for him, warning him of the next task, the fourth one. This is to climb a glass mountain in the middle of a lake and to bring from the top of it the egg of a bird that lays one egg only. The girl meets him at the edge of the lake, and by her suggestion he wishes her shoe a boat. They reach the mountain. He wishes her fingers a ladder. She warns him to tread on every step and not miss one. He forgets, steps over the last rung, and gets the egg; but the girl's finger is broken. She warns him to deny having had any help. The fifth task is to guess which daughter is which, as in the shape of birds they fly thrice over the castle. Forewarned by the girl, Jack names them correctly. The Green Man thereupon gives in, and Jack weds his daughter.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:28 am
by SashaGallagher
THE BLACK LADY
A young girl goes to service at an old castle with the Black Lady, who warns her not to look through the window. The Black Lady goes out. The girl gets bored, looks through the window, and sees the Black Lady playing cards with the devil. She falls down frightened. The Black Lady comes in and asks her what she has seen. 'Nothing saw I; nought can I say. Leave me alone; I am weary of my life.' The Black Lady beats her, and asks her again, What saw you through the window?' 'Nothing saw I,' etc. The girl runs off and meets a keeper, who takes her home, and after some years marries her. She has a child, and is bedded. Enter the Black Lady. 'What saw you through the window?' 'Nothing saw I,' etc. The Black Lady takes the child, dashes its brains out, and exit. Enter the husband. The wife offers no explanation, and the husband wants to burn her, but his mother intercedes and saves her this time. But the same thing happens again, and the husband makes a fire. As she is being brought to the stake, the Black Lady comes. 'What saw you through the window?' 'Nothing saw I,' etc. 'Take her and burn her,' says the Black Lady. They fasten her up, and bring a light. The same question, the same answer. The Black Lady sees that she is secret, so gives her back her .two children, and leaves her in peace.

THE TEN RABBITS
In a little house on the hill lived an old woman with her three sons, the youngest of them a fool. The eldest goes to seek his fortune, and tells his mother to bake him a cake. 'Which will you have--a big one and a curse with it, or a little one and a blessing in it?' He chooses a big cake. He comes to a stile and a beautiful road leading to a castle; he knocks at the castle door, and asks the old gentleman for work. He is sent into a field with the gentleman's rabbits. He eats his food, and refuses to give any to a little old man who asks for some. The rabbits run here and there. He tries to catch them, but fails to recover half of them. The gentleman counts them, and finds some missing, so cuts the eldest brother's head off, and sticks it on a gatepost. The second brother acts in the same way, and meets the same fate. The fool also will seek his fortune. He chooses a little cake with a blessing. His mother sends him with a sieve to get water for her. A robin bids him stop up the holes with leaves and clay. He does so, and brings water. He gets the cake and goes. He sees his two brothers' heads stuck on the gateposts, and stands laughing at them, saying, 'What are you doing there, you two fools?' and throwing stones at them. He enters, dines, and smiles at the old gentleman's daughter, who falls in love with him. He goes to the field, lets the rabbits go, and falls asleep. The rabbits run about here and there. An old man by the well begs food, and Jack shares his food with him. Jack hunts for hedgehogs. He can't get the rabbits back, but the old man gives him a silver whistle. Jack blows, and the rabbits return. The old gentleman counts them, and finds them correct. The girl brings Jack his dinner daily in the field. The old man tells Jack to marry her. He does so, still living as servant in the stable till the old people's death. Then he takes over the castle, and brings his mother to live 1 with him.

THE THREE WISHES
A fool lives with his mother. Once on a hillside he finds a young lady exposed to the heat of the sun, and twines a bower of bushes round her for protection. She awakes, and gives him three wishes. He wishes he were at home: no sooner said than done. On the way he catches a glimpse of a lovely lady at a window, and wishes idly that she were with child by him. She proves so, but knows not the cause. She bears a child, and her parents summon every one from far and near to visit her. When the fool enters, the babe says, 'Dad, dad!' Disgusted at the lover's low estate, the parents cast all three adrift in a boat. The lady asks him how she became with child, and he tells her. 'Then you must have a wish still left.' He wishes they were safe on shore in a fine castle of their own. They live happily there for some time, then return home, and visit the girl's parents splendidly dressed. The parents refuse to believe him the same man. He returns in his old clothes. Triumph and reconciliation. He provides for his old mother.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:32 am
by SashaGallagher
FAIRY BRIDE
A king has three sons, and knows not to which of them to leave his kingdom. They shoot for it with bow and arrows. The youngest shoots so far that his arrow is lost. He seeks it for a long time, and at last finds it sticking in a glass door. He enters and finds himself in the home of the Queen of the Fairies, whom he marries. After a while he returns home with his bride. An old witch who lives in the park incites the king to ask the fairy bride to fetch him a handkerchief which will cover the whole park. She does it, and then is asked to bring her brother. She refuses, but finally summons him. He enters, and terrifies the king by his threatening aspect. 'What did you call me for?' The king is too frightened to answer coherently. The fairy's brother kills him and the old witch, and vanishes. They live at the castle.

CINDERELLA
A glorious version, too long to take down, and now almost forgotten. After Cinderella's marriage the sisters live with her, and flirt with the prince. Her children are stolen, and Cinderella is turned into a sow. She protects the children, but at the instigation of the sisters (or stepmother) she is hunted by the prince's hounds and killed. The three children come to the hall, and beg for the sow's liver (its special efficacy forgotten). The children are followed and further restored to their father. Perhaps Cinderella herself comes again to life.

JACK THE ROBBER
Now we'll leave the master to stand a bit, and go back to the mother. So in the morning Jack says to his mother, 'Mother,' he says, 'give me one of them old bladders as hang up in the house, and,' he says, 'I'll fill it full of blood, and I'll tie it round your throat; and when the master comes up to ax me if I got the sheet, me and you will be having a bit of arglement, and I'll up with my fist and hit you on the bladder, and the bladder will bust, and you'll make yourself to be dead.'

Now the master comes. 'Have you got the sheet, Jack?

And just as he's axing him, he up with his fist, and hits his mother.

And the master says, 'O Jack, what did you kill your poor mother for?'

'Oh! I don't care; I can soon bring her right again.'

'No,' says the master, 'never, Jack.'

And Jack began to smile, and he says, 'Can't I? you shall see, then.' And he goes behind the door, and fetches a stick with a bit of a knob to it. Jack begin to laugh. He touches his mother with this stick, and the old woman jumped up. (This is s’posed to be an inchanted stick.)

Says the master: 'O Jack,' he says, 'what shall I give you for that stick?'

'Well, sir,' he says, 'I couldn't let you have that stick. My inchantment would be broke.'

'Well, Jack, if you'll let me have that stick, I'll never give you another thing to do as long as you live here.'

So he gave him £50 for this stick, and said he'd never give him nothing else to do for him. So the master went home to the house, and he didn't know which way to fall out with the missus, to try this stick. One day at dinner-time he happened to fall out with her; the dinner she put for him didn't please him. So he up with his fist and he knocked her dead.

In comes the poor servant-girl and says, 'O master, what ever did you kill the poor missus for?'

He says, 'I'll sarve you the same.' And he sarved her the same.

In come the wagoner, and he asked, 'What did he kill the missus and the sarvint for.' And he says, 'I'll sarve you the same,' he says. He wanted to try this stick what he had off Jack, He thought he could use it the same way as Jack. So he touched the missus with it fust, but she never rose. He touched the servant with it, and she never rose. He touched the wagoner, and he never rose. 'Well,' he says, 'I'll try the big end,' he says, and he tries the knob. So he battered and battered with the knob till he battered the brains out of the three of them.

He does no more, and he goes up to Jack and says, 'O Jack, you've ruined me for life.' He says, 'Jack, I shall have to drown you.'

So Jack says, 'All right, master.'

'Well, get in this bag,' he says; and he takes him on his back. As he was going along the road, he . . . went one field off the road, being a very methlyist man. During the time he was down there, there come a drōvyer by with his cattle. Now Jack's head was out of the sack.

'Hello! Jack, where are you going?'

'To heaven, I hope.'

'Oh! Jack, let me go. I'm an older man till you, and I'll give you all my money and this cattle.'

Jack told him to unloosen the bag to let him out, and for him to get into it. Away Jack goes with the cattle and the money. So the master comes up, taking no notice of it, and he picks the bag up, and puts it on his shoulder, and goes on till he comes to Monfort's Bridge. 1 He says, 'One, two, three'; and away he chucks him over.

Well, Jack goes now about the country, dealing in cattle. So in about three years' time he comes round the same way again, round the master's place.

So, 'Hello! Jack,' he says, 'where ever did you get them from?'

'Well, sir,' he says, 'when you throwed me, if I'd had a little boy at the turning to turn them straight down the road, I should have had as many more.'

So he says, 'Jack, will you chuck me there, and you stop at the turning to turn them.'

So Jack says,' You'll have to walk till you get there, for I can't carry you.'

And when he got to the bridge Jack put him in the bag, and Jack counted his 'One, two, three,' same as he counted for him, and away he goes. And Jack went back and took to the farm, and making very good use of it. For many a night he let me sleep in the field with my tent for telling that lie about him.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:42 am
by SashaGallagher
THE FOOL WITH THE SHEEP
The youngest of three brothers is a fool, and the two others want to kill him. They induce him to get into a sack as the way to go to heaven. He does so, and they take him to the sea. They stop for a drink at a tavern. A stranger comes by with sheep. He wants to go, and takes Jack's place, and is thrown into the sea. Jack returns with the sheep. The brothers find him at home with his flock, and ask where he got them. 'At the bottom of the sea.' They want to go too, so Jack throws them in, and returns home.

THE TINKER AND HIS WIFE
Once there was a tinker and his wife, and they got into a bit of very good country for yernin’ a few shillings quick. And in this country there wasn't very little lodgings. 'Well, my wench,' he said to his wife, 'I think we'll go and take that little empty house, and keep a little beer. Well, my wench, I'll order for a barrel of beer.' He has this barrel of beer in the house. 'Now, my wench, you make the biggest penny out of it as ever you can, and I'll go off for another week's walk.'

In the course of one day a packman come by. He says, 'It's gettin' very warm, missus, isn't it?'

'No, indeed,' she says, 'it's very cold weather.'

'I've got a very big load, and it makes me sweat, and I think it's warm.'

'I sell beer here,' she says.

He says, 'Well, God bless you, put me a drop for this penny.'

It was one of the old big pennies, and was the biggest penny she ever saw there. She brought him all the barrel for it. So she takes the penny and drops it in the basin on the mantel-shelf. He was there three days drinking till he emptied the barrel of beer. The husband comes home at the end of the week.

'Well, my wench, how did you get on?'

'Well, Jack, I did very well. I sold every drop of beer.'

'Well done, my wench, we'll have another one and see how that goes. Now, my wench, bring them few shillin's down, and let's see what you made upon it.'

She brings the basin down, and says, 'You telled me to make the biggest penny on it as ever I could.'

He begin to count it, and turns the basin upside down, and empties it on the table. And what was there but the one big penny?

'Well! well!! well!!!' he says, 'you'll ruin me now for life.'

'Ah!' she says, 'Jack, didn't you tell me to make the biggest penny out of it as ever I could, and that was the biggest penny as ever I seen.'

'Well,' he says, 'my wench, I see you don't understand sellin’ beer. I think I'll buy a little pig. We've got plenty of taters and cabbage in the garden. Well, now, my wench, when the butcher comes round to kill the pig, you walk round the garden and count every cabbage that's in the garden, and you get a little stick, and stick it by every cabbage in the garden, and when the butcher slays the pig up, you revide a piece of pig up for every cabbage in the garden.'

She revided a piece of pig up for every cabbage in the garden, and stuck it on every stick round the cabbages. The husband comes home again.

'Well, my wife, how did you go on with the pig?'

'Well, Jack, I done as you told me,' she says. 'I got a stick and stuck it by every cabbage, and put a piece of mate on every stick.'

'Well! well!! well!!!' he says, 'where is the mate gone to now? You'll ruin me if I stop here much longer. Pull the fire out,' he says, 'and I'll get away from here.' And he picks up his basket and throws it on his shoulder. 'Pull that door after you,' he says.

What did she do but she pulls all the fire out and put it into her apron. The old door of the house was tumbling down, and she picks it up and put it on her back. So him being into a temper, he didn't take much notice of her behind him. They travelled on, and it come very dark. They comes to an old hollow tree by the side of the road.

'Well, my wench, I think we'll stop here to-night.'

They goes up to the top of the old tree. After they got up in the tree, the robbers got underneath them.

'Whatever you do, my wench, keep quiet. This is a robbers' den.'

The robbers had plenty of meat and everything, and they prayed for a bit of fire.

She says, 'Jack,' she says, 'I shall have to drop it.'

So she drops the fire out of her apron, and it goed down the hollow tree.

'See, what a godsend that is,' said one.

They cooked the meat as they had. 'The Lord send me a drop of vinegar,' says one.

'Thank God for that,' says that other one. 'See what a godsend ’tis to us.'

Now, the door's fastened to her back yet, and she says, 'Jack, I shall have to drop it.'

'Drop what?' he says.

'I shall have to drop the door, Jack,' she says, 'the rope's cutting my shoulders in two.'

So she drop the door down the hollow tree, and it went dummel-tummel-tummel down the tree, and these robbers thought ’twas the devil himself coming. They jumps up, and away they goes down the road as hard as ever they could go. .The time as they run, Jack's wife goes down the tree and picks up the bag of gold what they'd left. Being frightened as they'd had such godsends to ’em, they left all behind.

They had one brother as was deaf and dumb. Him being a very valuable 1 fellow, he thought he'd come back to see what was the matter. He come peepin’ round the old tree. Who happened to see him but Jack's wife. And he went 'A a a a a a' to her.

'Come here,' she says, 'I can cure your speech.'

She made motions with her own mouth for him to put his tongue out. She drew the knife slightly from behind her as he put his tongue out, and cut half of his tongue off. Him being bleeding, he went 'Awa wa wa wa wa,' putting his hand to his mouth and making motions to his brothers. And when he got back to his brothers, them seeing him bleeding, they thought sure the devil was there.

I never see Jack nor his wife nor the robbers sense after they left the tree.

WINTER
An old man and woman, very poor, live in a cottage. The old man saves up money in a stocking for winter. A beggar comes to the door. The old woman asks his name. 'Winter.' 'Here is money, my old man, saved for you.' The old husband comes home. They leave the cottage, the old woman taking the door with her (reason not given), and camp out in a tree. Robbers come and camp underneath, and quarrel over the division of their spoil. They want change for £1. One says he will have change if he goes to the devil for it. Down falls the door. The robbers think it is the devil, and fly, leaving the money. The old man and woman seize it, and return to their cottage.

Re: Lucid Dreaming & Growing Dream Herbs

Posted: Sat Nov 15, 2014 2:53 am
by SashaGallagher
THE BLACK DOG OF THE WILD FOREST
There was a king and queen in the north of Ireland, and they had one son. The son had to be revoured when he came of age by the Black Dog of the Wild Forest, and his father was very fond of his son. When he came close to the time when he had to be revoured, his father took him a shorter journey every day; and one day his father saddled the best horse as he had in his stable, and gave him as much money as he liked to take with him. He galloped away as hard as ever he could till he got benighted. He rode some hundreds and hundreds of miles, and he could see a small little light a little distance off him, maybe a hundred miles off him to the best of his knowledge in the dark, and he makes for this little light. And who was living there but an old witch.

'Well, come in, 1 my king's son,' she said, 'from the North of Ireland. I know you aren't very well.'

And so when he comes in, she puts him in the ess-hole under the fire. He hadn't been in there but twenty minutes, but in comes the Black Dog of the Wild Forest, spitting fire yards away out of his mouth, th’ owd lady and her little dog named Hear-all after him. But they beat him.

'Now,' she says, 'my king's son, please to get up. You can have your tea now. We have beat him.'

So he gets up, has his tea with her, and gives a lot of money to the old lady, which says they have got a sister living from her three hundred miles. 'And if you can get there, ten to one she will give you her advice to get safe. I will give you my favours, the bread out of my mouth, that is Hear-all, the dog. I will give you that dog with you.'

He gallops on, gallops on, till he gets benighted. He looks behind him on the way he was going; his horse was getting very tired; and he could see the Black Dog of the Wild Forest after him. And he gallops on till he comes to t’other sister's house.

'Well, come in,' she says, 'my king's son from the North of Ireland. I know you aren't very well.'

She puts him down into the ess-hole again, sir; and she had a little dog named Spring-all. If they fought hard the first night they fought fifteen times harder with Hear-all and Spring-all and th' owd lady herself.

'Well,' she said, 'my king's son, I will do the best as ever I can for you. I will give you Spring-all, and I will give you the rod. Don't forget what I tell you to do with this rod. You follow this ball of worsted. Now it will take you right straight to a river. You will see the Black Dog of the Wild Forest, and s’ever you get to this river, you hit this rod in the water, and a fine bridge will jump up. And when you get to t’other side, just hit the water, and the bridge will fall in again, and the Black Dog of the Wild Forest cannot get you.'

He got into another wild forest over the water, and he got romping and moping about the forest by himself till he got very wild. He got moping about, and he found he got to a castle. That was the king's castle as he got over there to. He got to this castle, and the gentleman put him on to a job at this castle.

So he says to him, 'Jack, are you ony good a-shooting?'

'Yes, sir,' he says, 'I can shoot a little bit. I can shoot a long way further.'

'Well, will you go out to-day, Jack, and we will have a shot or two in the forest?'

They killed several birds and wild varmints in the forest. So him being sweet upon a daughter at this big hall, her and Jack got very great together. Jack tuck her down to the river to show her what he could do with his rod, him being laughing and joking with her. The king wanted a bridge made over the river, and he said there was no one as could do it.

'My dear,' says Jack, 'I could do it,' he says.

'With what?' she says.

'With my rod.'

He touched the water with his rod, and up springs as nice a bridge as ever you have seen up out of the water. Him being laughing and joking with this young girl, he come away and forgot the bridge standing. He comes home. Next day following he goes off again shooting with the king again, and the Black Dog of the Wild Forest comes to the king's house.

He says to th’ owd lady herself, 'Whatever you do to-morrow, Jack will be going out shooting again, and you get Jack to leave his two little dogs, as I am going to devour Jack. And whatever you do, you fasten ’em down in the cellar to-morrow, and I will follow Jack to the forest where he is going shooting. And if Jack kills me, he will bring me back on the top of his horse on the front of him; and you will say to him, "O Jack, what ever are you going to do with that?" "I am going to make a fire of it," he will say. And he will burn me, and when he burns me he will burn me to dust. And you get a small bit of stick--Jack will go away and leave me after--and you go and rake my dust about, and you will find a lucky-bone. And when Jack goes to his bed, you drop this lucky-bone in Jack's ear, he will never rise no more, and you can take and bury him.'

Now the old lady was against Jack a lot for being there. So the Black Dog of the Wild Forest told th' owd lady the way to kill Jack. 'So see as when Jack brings me back and burns me, you look in my dust, and you will find a lucky-bone, and you drop it when Jack goes to bed, drop it into his ear, and Jack will never rise from his bed no more, he will be dead. Take Jack and bury him.'

Jack goes to the forest a-shooting, and the Black Dog of the Wild Forest follows him, and Jack begin to cry. Now if the fire came from his mouth the first time, it came a hundred times more, and Jack begin to cry.

'Oh dear!' he cried, 'where is my little Hear-all and Spring-all?'He had no sooner said the words, five minutes but scarcely, comes up the two little dogs, and they’s a very terrible fight. But Jack masters him and kills him. He brings home the Black Dog of the Wild Forest on the front of his horse; he brings him back, Jack, on the front of his horse; and the king says, 'What ever are you going to do with that?'

'I'm going to burn him.'

After he burns him, he burns him to dust.

The Black Dog of the Wild Forest says to th’ owd lady, When Jack burns me to dust, you get a little stick and rake my dust about, and you will find a lucky-bone. You drop that lucky-bone in Jack's ear when he goes to bed, and Jack will never waken no more, and then you can take and bury him, and after that Jack is buried there will be no more said about him.'

Well, th’ owd woman did do so, sir. When Jack went to bed, she got this lucky-bone and did as the Black Dog of the Wild Forest told her. She did drop it in Jack's ear, and Jack was dead. They take Jack off to bury him. Jack been buried three days, and the parson wondered what these two little dogs was moping about the grave all the time. He couldn't get them away.

'I think we'll rise Jack again,' he says.

And s’ever they rise him, off opened the lid of the coffin, and little Hear-all jumped to the side of his head, and he licked the lucky-bone out of his ear. And up Jack jumped alive.

Jack says, 'Who ever put me here?'

'It was the king as had you buried here, Jack.'

Jack made his way home to his own father and mother. Going on the road Jack was riding bounded on the back of his horse's back. Hear-all says to him, 'Jack,' he says, 'come down, cut my head off.'

'Oh dear, no! Hear-all. I couldn't do that for the kindness you have done for me.'

'If you don't do it, Jack, I shall devour you.'

He comes down off his horse's back, and he kills little Hear-all. He cuts his head off, and well off timed [ofttimes] he goes crying about Hear-all, for what he done. Goes on a little further. Spring-all says to him, 'Jack, you have got to come down and serve me the same.'

Oh dear, no!' he says, 'Spring-all, I shall take it all to heart.'

'Well,' he says, 'if you don't come down, Jack,' he says, I will devour you.'

Jack comes down, and he cuts his head off, and he goes on the road, crying very much to hisself about his two little dogs. So going on this road as he was crying, he turned his head round at the back of his horse, looking behind him, and he sees two of the handsomest young ladies coming as ever he saw in his life.

'What are you crying for?' said these ladies to him.

'I am crying,' he said, 'about two little dogs, two faithful dogs, what I had.'

'What was the name of your little dogs?'

'One was named Hear-all, and the t’other was named Spring-all.'

'Would you know them two dogs if you would see them again?'

'Oh dear, yes!' says Jack. 'Oh dear, yes!' says Jack.

'Well, I am Hear-all, and this is Spring-all.'

Away Jack goes home to his father and mother, and lives very happy there all the days of his life.

THE BROWN BEAR OF THE GREEN GLEN
THERE was a king in Erin once who had a leash of sons. John was the name of the youngest one, and it was said that he was not wise enough. And this good, worldly king lost the sight of his eyes and the strength of his feet. The two eldest brothers said that they would go seek three bottles of the water of the green isle that was about the heaps of the deep. And so it was that these two brothers went away. Now the fool said that he would not believe but that he himself would go also. And the first big town he reached in his father's kingdom, there he sees his two brothers there, the blackguards.

'Oh! my boys,' says the young one, 'is it thus you are?'

'With swiftness of foot,' said they, 'take thyself home, or we will have thy life.'

'Don't be afraid, lads. It is nothing to me to stay with you.

Now John went away on his journey till he came to a great desert of a wood. 'Hoo, hoo!' says John to himself, 'it is not canny for me to walk this wood alone.' The night was coming now, and growing pretty dark. John ties the cripple white horse to the root of a tree, and he went up in the top himself. He was but a very short time in the top, when he saw a bear coming with a fiery cinder in his mouth.

'Come down, son of the King of Erin,' says he.

'Indeed, I won't come. I am thinking I am safer where I am.'

'But if thou wilt not come down, I will go up,' said the bear.

'Art thou, too, taking me for a fool?' says John. 'A shaggy, shambling creature like thee, climbing a tree.'

'But if thou wilt not come down, I will go up,' says the bear, as he fell out of hand to climbing the tree.

'Lord! thou canst do that same!' said John; 'keep back from the root of the tree, then, and I will go down to talk to thee.'

And when the son of Erin's king drew down, they came to chatting. The bear asked him if he was hungry.

'Week by your leave,' said John, 'I am a little at this very same time.'

The bear took that wonderful watchful turn, and he catches a roebuck. 'Now, son of Erin's king,' says the bear, 'whether wouldst thou like thy share of the buck boiled or raw?'

'The sort of meat I used to get would be kind of plotted boiled,' says John. And thus it fell out; John got his share roasted.

'Now,' said the bear, 'lie down between my paws, and thou hast no cause to fear cold or hunger till morning.'

Early in the morning the bear asked, 'Art thou asleep, son of Erin's king?'

'I am not very heavily,' said he.

'It is time for thee to be on thy soles, then. Thy journey is long--two hundred miles. But art thou a good horseman, John?'

'There are worse than me at times,' said he.

'Thou hadst best get on top of me, then.'

He did this, and at the first leap John was to earth. 'Foil! foil!' says John. 'What! thou art not bad at the trade thyself. Thou hadst best come back till we try thee again.'

And with nails and teeth he fastened on the bear, till they reached the end of the two hundred miles and a giant's house.

'Now, John,' said the bear, 'thou shalt go to pass the night in this giant's house. Thou wilt find him pretty grumpy, but say thou that it was the Brown Bear of the Green Glen that set thee here for a night's share, and don't thou be afraid that thou wilt not get share and comfort.'

And he left the bear to go to the giant's house.

'Son of Erin's king,' says the giant, 'thy coming was in the prophecy; but if I did not get thy father, I have got his son. I don't know whether I will put thee in the earth with my feet or in the sky with my breath.'

'Thou wilt do neither of either,' said John, 'for it is the Brown Bear of the Green Glen that set me here.'

'Come in, son of Erin's king,' said he, 'and thou shalt be well taken to this night.'

And as he said, it was true. John got meat and drink without stint. But to make a long tale short, the bear took John day after day to the third giant. 'Now,' says the bear, 'I have not much acquaintance with this giant, but thou wilt not be long in his house when thou must wrestle with him. And if he is too hard on thy back, say then, "If I had the Brown Bear of the Green Glen here, that was thy master."'

As soon as John went in, 'Ai! ai!! or ee! ee!!' says the giant. 'If I did not get thy father, I have got his son.'

And to grips they go. They would make the boggy bog of the rocky rock. In the hardest place they would sink to the knee, in the softest up to the thighs; and they would bring wells of spring water from the face of every rock. 1 The giant gave John a sore wrench or two.

'Foil! foil!!' says he. 'If I had here the Brown Bear of the Green Glen, thy leap would not be so hearty.'

And no sooner spoke he the word than the worthy bear was at his side.

'Yes! yes!' says the giant, 'son of Erin's king, now I know thy matter better than thou dost thyself.'

So it was that the giant ordered his shepherd to bring home the best wether he had in the hill, and to throw his carcass before the great door. 'Now, John,' says the giant, an eagle will come and she will settle on the carcass of this wether, and there is a wart on the ear of this eagle which thou must cut off with this sword, but a drop of blood thou must not draw.'

The eagle came, but she was not long eating when John drew close to her, and with one stroke he cut the wart of her without drawing one drop of blood. (Och! is not that a fearful lie?) 'Now,' said the eagle, 'come on the root of my two wings, for I know thy matter better than thou dost thyself.'

He did this, and they were now on sea and now on land, and now on the wing, till they reached the Green Isle.

'Now, John,' says she, 'be quick and fill thy three bottles. Remember that the black dogs are away just now.' ('What dogs?'--Black dogs. Dost thou not know that they always had black dogs chasing the Gregorach?)

When he filled the bottles with the water out of the well, he sees a little house beside him. John said to himself that he would go in, and that he would see what was in it. And the first chamber he opened, he saw a full bottle. ('And what was in it?' What should be in it but whisky.) He filled a glass out of it, and he drank it; and when he was going, he gave a glance, and the bottle was as full as it was before. 'I will have this bottle along with the bottles of water,' says he. Then he went into another chamber, and he saw a loaf. He took a slice out of it, but the loaf was as whole as it was before. 'Ye gods! I won't leave thee,' says John. He went on thus till he came to another chamber. He saw a great cheese; he took a slice of the cheese, but it was as whole as ever. 'I will have this along with the rest,' says he. Then he went to another chamber, and he saw laid there the very prettiest little jewel of a woman he ever saw. 'It were a great pity not to kiss thy lips, my love,' says John.

Soon after John jumped on top of the eagle, and she took him on the self-same steps till they reached the house of the big giant. And they went paying rent to the giant, and there was the sight of tenants and giants and meat and drink.

'Well, John,' says the giant, 'didst thou see such drink as this in thy father's house in Erin?'

'Pooh!' says John, 'hoo! my hero, thou other man, I have a drink this is unlike it.' He gave the giant a glass out of the bottle, but the bottle was as full as it was before.

'Well! ' said the giant, 'I will give thee myself two hundred notes, 1 a bridle, and a saddle for the bottle.'

'It is a bargain, then,' says John; 'but that the first sweetheart I ever had must get it if she comes the way.'

'She will get that,' says the giant.

But to make the long story short, he left each loaf and cheese with the two other giants, with the same covenant that the first sweetheart he ever had should get them if she came the way, Now John reached his father's big town in Erin, and he sees his two brothers as he left them, the blackguards. 'You had best come with me, lads,' says he, 'and you will get a dress of cloth and a saddle and bridle each.' And so they did; but when they were near to their father's house, the brothers thought that they had better kill him, and so it was that they set on him. And when they thought he was dead, they threw him behind a dyke; and they took from him the three bottles of water, and they went home.

John was not too long here, when his father's smith came the way with a cart-load of rusty iron. John called out, 'Whoever the Christian is that is there, oh! that he should help him.' The smith caught him, and he threw John amongst the iron. And because the iron was so rusty, it went into each wound and sore that John had; and so it was that John became rough-skinned and bald.

Here we will leave John, and we will go back to the pretty little jewel that John left in the Green Isle. She became pale and heavy, and at the end of three quarters she had a fine lad son. 'Oh! in all the great world,' says she, 'how did I find this?'

'Foil! foil!' says the hen-wife, 'don't let that set thee thinking. Here's for thee a bird, and as soon as he sees the father of thy son, he will hop on the top of his head.'

The Green Isle was gathered from end to end, and the people were put in at the back door and out at the front door; but the bird did not stir, and the babe's father was not found. Now here she said she would go through the world altogether till she should find the father of the babe. Then she came to the house of the big giant and sees the bottle. 'Ai! ai!' said she, 'who gave thee this bottle?'

Said the giant, 'It was young John, son of Erin's king, that left it.'

'Well, then, the bottle is mine,' said she.

But to make a long story short, she came to the house of each giant, and she took with her each bottle and each loaf and each cheese, till at last she came to the house of the king of Erin. Then the five-fifths of Erin were gathered, and the bridge of nobles of the people; they were put in at the back door and out at the front door, but the bird did not stir. Then she asked if there was one other or any one else at all in Erin that had not been here.

'I have a bald rough-skinned gillie in the smithy,' said the smith, 'but------'

'Rough on or off, send him here,' says she.

No sooner did the bird see the head of the bald rough-skinned gillie than he took a flight and settles on the bald top of the rough-skinned lad. She caught him and kissed him: 'Thou art the father of my babe.'

'But, John,' says the great king of Erin, 'it is thou that gottest the bottles of water for me.'

'Indeed ’twas I,' says John.

'Weel, then, what art thou willing to do to thy two brothers?'

'The very thing they wished to do to me, do for them.'

And that same was done. John married the daughter of the king of the Green Isle, and they made a great rich wedding that lasted seven days and seven years. And thou couldst but hear Leeg, leeg, and Beeg, beeg, solid sound and peg-drawing. Gold a-crushing from the soles of their feet to the tips of their fingers, the length of seven years and seven days.

THE TALE OF THE SOLDIER
There was an old soldier once, and he left the army. He went to the top of a hill that was at the upper end of the town-land, and he said, 'Well, may it be that the Mischief may come and take me with him on his back the next time that I come again in sight of this town.'

Then he was walking till he came to the house of a gentleman that was there. John asked the gentleman if he would get leave to stay in his house that night.

'Well, then,' said the gentleman, 'since thou art an old soldier, and hast the look of a man of courage, without dread or fear in thy face, there is a castle at the side of yonder wood, and thou mayest stay in it till day. Thou shalt have a pipe and baccy, a cogie full of whisky, and a Bible to read. 1

When John got his supper, he took himself to the castle. He set on a great fire, and when a while of the night had come, there came two tawny women in, and a dead man's kist between them. They threw it at the fireside, and they sprang out. John arose, and with the heel of his foot he drove out its end, and he dragged out an old hoary bodach. And he set him sitting in the great chair; he gave him a pipe and baccy, and a cogie of whisky; but the bodach let them fall on the floor.

'Poor man,' said John, 'the cold is on thee.'

John laid himself stretched in the bed, and he left the bodach to toast himself at the fireside; but about the crowing of the cock he went away.

The gentleman came well early in the morning. 'What rest didst thou find, John?'

'Good rest,' said John, 'Thy father was not the man that would frighten me.'

'Right, good John, thou shalt have two hundred pund, and lie to-night in the castle.'

'I am the man that will do that,' said John.

And that night it was the very like. There came three tawny women, and a dead man's kist with them amongst them. They threw it up to the side of the fireplace, and they took their soles out of that. John arose, and with the heel of his boot he broke the head of the kist, and he dragged out of it the old hoary man. And, as he did the night before, he set him sitting in the big chair, and gave him pipe and baccy; and he let them fall.

'Oh! poor man,' said John, 'cold is on thee.'

Then he gave him a cogie of drink, and he let that fall also.

'Oh! poor man, thou art cold.'

The bodach went as he did the night before. 'But,' said John to himself, 'if I stay here this night, and that thou shouldst come, thou shalt pay my pipe and baccy, and my cogie of drink.'

The gentleman came early enough in the morning, and he asked, 'What rest didst thou find last night, John?'

'Good rest,' said John. 'It was not the hoary bodach, thy father, that would put fear on me.'

'Och!' said the gentleman, 'if thou stayest to-night thou shalt have three hundred pund.'

'It's a bargain,' said John.

When it was a while of the night there came four tawny women, and a dead man's kist with them amongst them. And they set that down at the side of John. John arose, and he drew his foot, and he drove the head out of the kist. And he dragged out the old hoary man, and he set him in the big chair. He reached him the pipe and the baccy, the cup and the drink; but the old man let them fall, and they were broken.

'Och!' said John, 'before thou goest this night, thou shalt pay me all thou hast broken.'

But word came there not from the head of the bodach. Then John took the belt of his abersgaic, 1 and he tied the bodach to his side, and he took him with him to bed. When the heath-cock crowed, the bodach asked him to let him go.

'Pay what thou hast broken first,' said John.

'I will tell thee, then,' said the old man, 'there is a cellar of drink under, below me, in which there is plenty of drink, tobacco, and pipes. There is another little chamber beside the cellar, in which there is a caldron full of gold. And under the threshold of the big door there is a crocky full of silver. Thou sawest the women that came with me to-night?'

'I saw,' said John.

'Well, there thou hast four women from whom I took the cows, and they in extremity. They are going with me every night thus, punishing me. But go thou and tell my son how I am being wearied out. Let him go and pay the cows, and let him not be heavy on the poor. Thou thyself and he may divide the gold and silver between you; and marry thyself my old girl. But mind, give plenty of gold of what is left to the poor, on whom I was too hard. And I will find rest in the world of worlds.'

The gentleman came, and John told him as I have told thee. But John would not marry the old girl of the hoary bodach. At the end of a day or two John would not stay longer. He filled his pockets full of the gold, and he asked the gentleman to give plenty of gold to the poor. He reached the house, 1 but he was wearying at home, and he had rather be back with the regiment. He took himself off on a day of days, and he reached the hill above the town, from which he went away. But who should come to him but the Mischief.

'Hoth! hoth! John, thou hast come back?'

'Hoth on thyself!' quoth John, 'I came. Who art thou? 'I am the Mischief, the man to whom thou gayest thyself when thou was here last.'

'Ai! ai!' said John, 'it's long since I heard tell of thee, but I never saw thee before. There is glamour on my eyes; I will not believe that it is thou at all. But make a snake of thyself, and I will believe thee.'

The Mischief did this.

'Make now a lion of roaring.'

The Mischief did this.

'Spit fire now seven miles behind thee and seven miles before thee.'

The Mischief did this.

'Well,' said John, 'since I am to be a servant with thee, come into my abersgaic, and I will carry thee. But thou must not come out till I ask thee, or else the bargain's broke.'

The Mischief promised, and he did this.

Now,' said John, 'I am going to see a brother of mine that is in the regiment. But keep thou quiet.'

So now John went into the town; and one yonder and one here would cry, 'There is John the desairtair.' There was gripping of John, and a court held on him; and so it was that he was to be hanged about mid-day on the morrow. And John asked no favour but to be floored with a bullet.

The Coirneal said, 'Since he was an old soldier, and in the army so long, that he should have his asking.'

On the morrow, when John was to be shot, and the soldiers foursome round all about him, 'What is that they are saying?' said the Mischief. 'Let me amongst them, and I won't be long scattering them.'

'Cuist! cuist! ' said John.

'What's that speaking to thee?' said the Coirneal.

'Oh! it's but a white mouse,' said John.

'Black or white,' said the Coirneal, 'don't thou let her out of the abersgaic, and thou shalt have a letter of loosing, and let's see no more of thee.'

John went away, and in the mouth of night he went into a barn where there were twelve men threshing. 'Oh! lads,' said John, 'here's for you my old abersgaic; and take a while threshing it, it is so hard that it is taking the skin off my back.'

They took as much as two hours of the watch at the abersgaic with the twelve flails; and at last, every blow they gave it, it would leap to the top of the barn, and it was casting one of the threshers now and again on his back. When they saw that, they asked him to be out of that, himself and his abersgaic; they would not believe but that the Mischief was in it.

Then he went on his journey, and he went into a smithy where there were twelve smiths striking their great hammers. 'Here's for you, lads, an old abersgaic, and I will give you half-a-crown, and take a while at it with the twelve great hammers; it is so hard that it is taking the skin off my back.'

But that was fun for the smiths; it was good sport for them, the abersgaic of the soldier. But every sgaile it got, it was bounding to the top of the smithy. 'Go out of this, thyself and it,' said they; 'we will not believe that the Bramman 1 is in it.'

So then John went on, and the Mischief on his back; and he reached a great furnace that was there.

'Where art thou going now, John?' said the Mischief. 'Patience a little, and thou 'It see that,' said John.

'Let me out,' said the Mischief, 'and I will never put trouble on thee in this world.'

'Nor in the next?' said John.

'That's it,' said the Mischief.

'Stop, then,' said John, 'till thou get a smoke.'

And so saying, John cast the abersgaic and the Mischief into the middle of the furnace: and himself and the furnace went as a green flame of fire to the skies.