Canadian Genocide

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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby sig hawp » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:20 pm

Two websites with excerpts from the book:
American Holocaust, by David Stannard, Oxford Press, 1992

http://thirdworldtraveler.com/Histor...Holocaust.html

p66
I certify to you that, with the help of God, we shall powerfully enter into your country and shall make war against you in all ways and manners that we can, and shall subject you to the yoke and obedience of the Church and of Their Highnesses. We shall take you and your wives and your children, and shall make slaves of them, and as such shall sell and dispose of them as Their Highnesses may command. And we shall take your goods, and shall do you all the mischief and damage that we can, as to vassals who do not obey and refuse to receive their lord and resist and contradict him.

a statement Spaniards were required to read to Indians they encountered in the New World


http://www.the7thfire.com/Native_Ame..._Genocide.html

p69
Wherever the marauding, diseased, and heavily armed Spanish forces went out on patrol, accompanied by ferocious armored dogs that had been trained to kill and disembowel, they preyed on the local communities- already plague-enfeebled-forcing them to supply food and women and slaves, and whatever else the soldiers might desire. At virtually every previous landing on this trip Columbus's troops had gone ashore and killed indiscriminately, as though for sport, whatever animals and birds and natives they encountered, "looting and destroying all they found," as the Admiral's son Fernando blithely put it. Once on Hispaniola, however, Columbus fell ill-whether from the flu or, more likely, from some other malady-and what little restraint he had maintained over his men disappeared as he went through a lengthy period of recuperation. The troops went wild, stealing, killing, raping, and torturing natives, trying to force them to divulge the whereabouts of the imagined treasure-houses of gold.
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby sig hawp » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:22 pm

Nishnabe News
Napanee
400+ people marched on prison in support of Robert Lovelace
Hundreds protest native leader's jailing
Geoff Nixon
Saturday, February 23, 2008

More than 400 people marched on the Quinte Detention Centre in
Napanee, Ont. Saturday, banging drums and waving placards in protest
of the jailing of a retired Ardoch Algonquin First Nation chief on
charges of contempt. Robert Lovelace, 59, was sentenced to six months
in jail on Feb. 15, for his part in organizing a series of protests
against a proposed uranium mining operation at a site near Clarendon
Station, Ont. - about 90 kilometres north of Kingston - last year.

A private mining company, Frontenac Ventures Corporation, has begun
exploring a 5,000-hectare Sharbot Lake-area site to determine if it
is suitable for mining uranium. When he and other protesters formed
a "tent city" and blockade at an entrance to the site for several
months last year, they were ordered to cease and desist by a
provincial court. The mining company then enacted civil contempt
proceedings against a number of the protesters, including Lovelace,
which resulted in his jailing earlier this month. After he was
sentenced, he was remanded to the Napanee facility, but was moved to
the Central East Correctional Facility in Lindsay, Ont. on Thursday.

Saturday's protest began at 11 a.m. at an arena near the detention
centre, with speakers reading out letters of support from politicians
and citizens. Two hours later, the protesters marched to the
detention centre and back to the arena. "We had what we thought was a
fabulous turnout," said Donna Dillman, a Sharbot Lake-area resident
who went on a hunger strike last fall in protest of uranium mining.
Dillman said organizers counted 428 protesters who took part in the
day's events.
http://www.canada.com/saskatoonstarp...ws/story.html?
id=c584b086-5884-4145-93d0-d657f4ce14c6&k=3651
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby sig hawp » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:23 pm

Graphic list of residential school abuses determining amount of
payment.
Graphic list of abuse to settle claims Complex system of determining
payment seen as necessary to manage huge number of complaints by
former residential-school students.

KATHERINE O'NEILL
From Monday's Globe and Mail
February 25, 2008 at 4:42 AM EST

EDMONTON — It's a scorecard ranking unspeakable acts. From sodomy to
severe beatings causing disfigurement to persistent fondling - the
list is graphic and disturbingly thorough. It's all part of a
complicated compensation system that a court-ordered independent
program is now using to settle serious sexual- and physical-abuse
claims by former residential-school students.
The majority are aboriginal. All were either children or teenagers
when they were assaulted, often by the adults paid and trusted to
look after or teach them.

The closed-door private hearings, which began late last year in
locations across the country, are expected to process about 12,500
claimants by 2013. The more abuse a person can prove, along with
providing supporting evidence of subsequent harm, such as a forced
abortion, substance-abuse problems or lost income, the higher the
rate of financial compensation that person is entitled to from the
federal government. The maximum amount is $245,000. However, if a
person can prove income loss, the final amount can be increased to up
to $430,000.

Peter Harris, a Vancouver-based lawyer who helped the federal
government, aboriginal leaders, churches and others draw up the
compensation rules for the new Independent Assessment Process,
acknowledges they are painfully detailed and could upset victims. "It
troubles some people and it troubles me," he said. "But because of
the huge number of claims, it's a manageable way to approach the
issue and try to get some level of standardization." Mr. Harris's law
firm has been representing former residential-school students since
the 1990s. He said before this program, victims either had to go to
court or apply for a hearing from the federally run Alternative
Dispute Resolution program. The dispute resolution program was
similar to the new program, but was voluntary and not binding and
didn't have as many categories of abuse for claimants to choose from.

The new program, which is independent and supervised by nine
provincial and territorial courts, is also expected to give out
larger settlements. The Independent Assessment Process is part of a
larger historic $4-billion residential-schools settlement agreement
that came into effect last fall. The settlement, which was negotiated
by the federal government, aboriginal groups, churches and lawyers
representing former students, included a lump-sum payment for all
surviving former residential students, approximately 80,000 people.
The average payment is about $28,000.

Former students had the right to opt out. Only 348 did, which gives
them the right to settle abuse claims or other grievances through the
courts. Most of the schools were church-run, but supported
financially by the Canadian government from the 1870s to the 1970s.

Angus Cockney, a 51-year-old Inuvialuit artist and businessman, is
not impressed with the settlement, arguing former residential-school
students like him have been largely shafted. "Look at someone like
Maher Arar. He got millions from the government. I'd argue he got it
easy compared to many residential students," he said. "Why I should
be treated less? Look at my case. Look at all of our cases." In 2007,
Mr. Arar, a Canadian engineer who had been illegally sent to Syria
where he says he was tortured after the RCMP wrongly labelled him an
Islamic extremist, was given a compensation package worth more than
$10-million.

Even still, Mr. Cockney is applying for a hearing. "I've been silent
for 35, 40 years; I can't suppress it any longer," said the divorced
father of two who now lives in Canmore, Alta. He was born in a camp
east of Tuktoyaktuk, a small community located 350 kilometres north
of the Arctic Circle. In 1961, when he was five, he remembers a float
plane landing at their outpost camp on the Arctic Ocean, and
people "abducting" him from his parents. He was flown to Grollier
Hall, a Catholic-run residential school in Inuvik, along with his
brother Rex, who was seven, and his sister Regina, who was six. They
were all given numbers. He was 248.

The next 12 years were largely a nightmare of constant physical,
sexual and mental abuse for Mr. Cockney. "These people were supposed
to exemplify love, but instead they taught us to hate," he said. For
years, Mr. Cockney, who became an accomplished cross-country skiing
athlete and North Pole adventurer, never admitted to anyone what had
happened to him at Grollier Hall.

But in the late 1990s, after four male former school employees were
convicted of sex crimes, the memories began flooding back.
He said many of his ex-classmates also struggled through the years,
dozens either killing themselves or turning to drugs or alcohol to
suppress the pain of the abuse and loss of language and culture. To
this day, he has still not spoken about his own horrific experience
with his ex-wife, children or siblings. "It's the native way. It's
not the right way," he admitted. Instead, Mr. Cockney has often used
art to express himself, and in 1999, even created a haunting
sculpture called Remembering.

Abuse claimants are allowed to pick where their hearings are
conducted, and Mr. Cockney either wants his to be held in Inuvik or
the spot east of Tuktoyaktuk where he was stolen from his parents. An
adjudicator conducts the hearing, which has a standard of proof
similar to a civil proceeding. Only a handful of people are allowed
to sit in, including the claimant, a health support worker and a
representative from the Canadian government.

Mr. Cockney said the compensation grid is a necessary evil, but he's
concerned it doesn't go far enough because it doesn't include
categories such as the effects of being abducting and the trauma
resulting from the lack of an official government apology.
During this process, he also wants to find answers about his family,
including what happened to his parents, Annie and Stanley, and three
younger siblings. When he was eight, he was told they all died in a
fire, but he has never been able to find burial markers for his
siblings.

Daniel Ish, chief adjudicator of the Independent Assessment Process,
is hopeful these hearings will help former residential students heal.
He said while it's a complex program, it's a "gentler" alternative to
going to court, which can be quite expensive, time-consuming and
adversarial. Mr. Ish acknowledged adjudicators will face many
challenges, including assessing claims where so much time has passed
since the alleged abuse took place. "But they aren't
insurmountable. ...You don't shy away because of the challenges."

COMPLEX COMPENSATION RULES

A court-ordered independent program is using the following
compensation system to help settle serious sexual- and physical-abuse
claims by former residential-school students. The maximum amount of
compensation for abuse is $245,000. However, if a person can prove
income loss, the final amount can be increased to up to $430,000.
The following list outlines the approximate range of compensation
allowed for the abuse described.

$54,000 - $85,000
Repeated, persistent incidents of anal or vaginal intercourse
Repeated, persistent incidents of anal/vaginal penetration with an
object
$40,000 - $55,000
One or more incidents of anal or vaginal intercourse
Repeated, persistent incidents of oral intercourse
One or more incidents of anal/vaginal penetration with an object
$25,000 - $45,000
One or more incidents of oral intercourse
One or more incidents of digital anal/vaginal penetration
One or more incidents of attempted anal/vaginal penetration
(excluding attempted digital penetration)
Repeated, persistent incidents of masturbation
$11,000 - $24,000
One or more physical assaults causing a physical injury that led to
or should have led to hospitalization or serious medical treatment by
a physician; permanent or demonstrated long-term physical injury,
impairment or disfigurement; loss of consciousness; broken bones; or
a serious but temporary incapacitation such that bed rest or
infirmary care of several days duration was required. Examples
include severe beating, whipping and second-degree burning
One or more incidents of simulated intercourse
One or more incidents of masturbation
Repeated, persistent fondling under clothing
$7,500 - $10,000
One or more incidents of fondling or kissing
Nude photographs taken of the claimant
The act of an adult employee or other adult lawfully on the premises
exposing themselves
Any touching of a student, including touching with an object, by an
adult employee or other adult lawfully on the premises which exceeds
recognized parental contact and violates the sexual integrity of the
student
$7,500 - $24,000
Being singled out for physical abuse by an adult employee or other
adult lawfully on the premises which was grossly excessive in
duration and frequency and which caused psychological consequential
harms
Any other wrongful act committed by an adult employee or other adult
lawfully on the premises which is proven to have caused psychological
consequential harms
Aggravating factors
The following could increase the amount of compensation by up to 15
per cent:
Verbal abuse
Racist acts
Threats
Intimidation/inability to complain; oppression
Humiliation; degradation
Sexual abuse accompanied by violence
Age of the victim or abuse of a particularly vulnerable child
Failure to provide care or emotional support following abuse
requiring such care
Witnessing another student being subjected to an act set out in the
above list
Use of religious doctrine, paraphernalia or authority during, or in
order to facilitate, the abuse
Being abused by an adult who had built a particular relationship of
trust and caring with the victim (betrayal)
Source: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servl...225.wabuse25/B
NStory/National/home
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby sig hawp » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:41 pm

E Fry
Inuvik
Girl in young offender facility tasered by RCMP
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story...cmp-taser.html
RCMP probe Taser incident involving girl in Inuvik jail
Monday, February 25, 2008 |

RCMP in the Northwest Territories are investigating their use of a stun gun on a teenage girl at a youth detention centre in Inuvik last year. The internal investigation into the March 27, 2007, incident at the Arctic Tern Young Offender Facility should be complete within a few weeks, RCMP spokesman Sgt. Larry O'Brien told CBC News. Officers will examine whether the officers involved broke the law and whether they followed the RCMP's policies on Taser use when they shocked the girl with the electronic stun gun.

Corrections officials told CBC News last week that the teen was acting so aggressively that corrections staff called in police, who subdued her using the Taser. The incident came to light last week when Inuvik Twin Lakes MLA Robert C. McLeod asked Justice Minister Jackson Lafferty about it in the legislative assembly. Corrections director Darin Reeves said it was the first time a Taser had been used at an N.W.T. correctional facility. He said corrections officers did the right thing by calling in police. "No one wants to have an event like this happen," Reeves said. "Certainly when you're looking at protecting the environment itself and the youth from harming themself or others, you will go through every option you can to try and contain that situation."

Reeves said the girl was examined afterwards and was fine. But the girl's mother has since been trying to get answers through McLeod about why the incident happened in the first place.

Taser use higher in Inuvik: RCMP

RCMP figures show there are more incidents involving Taser stun guns in Inuvik than anywhere else in the territory. Between September 2006 and November 2007, police reported a total of 54 Taser-related incidents in N.W.T., including 26 in Inuvik and seven in Yellowknife. O'Brien said those numbers include situations in which officers produced the weapon but didn't fire, as well as actual Taser use. Most of the time, he said, just saying a Taser will be used is enough to prompt people to co-operate. "It is certainly something you use, not as a last resort but when you're approaching a last resort," O'Brien said. "When you're to the point where you either use that or use a firearm, that would be a situation where members would be looking at using a conductive energy weapon."

O'Brien could not explain the discrepancy between Taser usage in Inuvik and Yellowknife, but said the number of officers in the two communities could play a role. Inuvik has two officers on duty on any given night, he said, while Yellowknife could have as many as eight officers. "If there's a situation in Yellowknife, we have the ability to bring multiple members to the scene in a short period of time. Those of us in policing know that the amount of police officers present usually has a big impact on the activities of the people involved in the complaint," he said. "Inuvik doesn't have that luxury. So they have to be very cognizant of what tools they have at hand, and that may go some way to explaining why the conductive energy weapons are being used more in Inuvik." Tasers are involved in fewer than one per cent of arrests made in the territory, O'Brien said.
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby sig hawp » Tue Feb 26, 2008 6:42 pm

Toronto
Byron Debassige (28) fatally shop by cops - stole lemons from a market
fwd from Graeme Bacque
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/306134
EDITORIAL
A shooting in a park
Feb 24, 2008 04:30 AM

A 28-year-old man, Byron Debassige, was fatally shot by police in a Toronto park last Saturday night. After taking over the case, the Special Investigations Unit, which probes all shootings involving police, issued a news release that said: "Officers were dispatched to the area of Davisville subway station to investigate reports of a robbery. Two uniform officers located a 28-year-old man in Oriole Park. A confrontation ensued between the man and the officers, resulting in the man being shot. He was taken to St. Michael's Hospital, where he was pronounced dead."

Star reporter Robyn Doolittle learned that an apparently drunken Debassige had stolen a few lemons from a nearby market and had brandished a 10-cm knife after being chased by a store employee. A witness in the park said that Debassige was stumbling around, singing and asking passersby for change, without incident after his requests were denied. After hearing the officers scream, "Put down the knife, put down the knife," the witness said four shots were fired and Debassige fell dead. Two officers went to hospital with minor injuries.

A search of Facebook reveals that Debassige was aboriginal, and shows a picture of a handsome, clean-cut young man. Friends on Facebook say he suffered from mental-health problems. Could this tragedy, starting with the theft of a few lemons, been
averted? The Star is not questioning whether the officers followed police protocol in drawing their guns; that will be for the SIU to decide. The real question is: Did the police have other options? As Oriole Park is only a few blocks from 53 Division, could the officers not have kept Debassige at bay while awaiting backup? Could the police not have brought in an expert to "talk down" a person in Debassige's state? Even in a big city, it is hard to believe that the such a bizarre chain of events had to end the way it did. Life shouldn't be that cheap.

http://www.insidetoronto.com/printArticle/41910
SIU probing shooting death
Man shot by police in Oriole Park
Feb. 19 2008

The Special Investigations Unit is probing the death of a man shot by police in a midtown park Saturday night. Byron Debassige, 28, was shot by Toronto Police in Oriole Park, in the Frobisher Avenue and Lascelles Boulevard area. The shooting happened just before 8:30 p.m. Saturday. Police were called to the area after reports of a robbery. Two uniformed officers located a man in the park; witnesses reported the man was carrying a knife. A confrontation ensued between the officers and Debassige, resulting in him being shot. He was taken by ambulance to St. Michael’s Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

Witnesses reported hearing four shots.
SIU investigators have designated two officers as subject officers and six as witness officers. An autopsy was performed Monday, but details aren’t being released at this point. The SIU is canvassing the area around the incident scene looking for witnesses; they are appealing for anyone with information to contact the unit at 416-622-1957 or 1-800-787-8529 ext. 1957. The SIU is a civilian agency that investigates cases of serious injuries and death involving the police.
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby spy shop » Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:43 pm

Indigenous Resistance! Uhuru Radio Talks Live with Russell Means on the Lakota Nation's Independence - Sunday, 4pm ET

On December 17, 2007, The Lakota Freedom Delegation traveled to Washington, D.C. to inform the United States Department of State that the Lakota were unilaterally withdrawing from the several treaties between themselves and the United States government.

Russell Means and other longtime Indigenous activists declared the Lakota to be "predecessor sovereign of Dakota Territory" and cited gross U.S. violations of the treaties as the immediate cause for withdrawal. They invited the U.S. government to enter into negotiations with the newly-declared entity, identified as "Lakotah", and warned that if good-faith negotiations were not begun, "Lakotah will begin to administer liens against real estate transactions within the five state area of Lakotah."

Tune in to "Solidarity Not Charity" Sunday for a discussion with Russell Means on this historic indigenous declaration of independence and indigenous resistance throughout the European occupation of "Turtle Island" (North America).


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Africanist Movement Exposes New
Neo-Colonial Regime in Sierra Leone
(read full story by Chernoh Alpha M. Bah at www.uhurunews.com)

A recent statement issued by the British Department for International Development (DFID) revealed that England has provided some US$72 million to support what it refers to as “a new social and economic reform program” in Sierra Leone to be carried out by the newly imposed neocolonial regime of Ernest Bai Koroma.

In a presentation held at Chatham House (formerly the Royal Institute for International Affairs) during his visit to London, Ernest Koroma told British politicians and multinationals that his government is committed to a “corporate agenda” — one that will provide guarantees for multinational investment and exploitation. more


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Barack Obama - White Power in Black Face!
(Part 4 on YouTube - click to watch video, visit http://youtube.com/watch?v=SFOR5c1_VSg)
Check out part 4 of this ongoing series of video clips of African People's Socialist Party Chairman Omali Yeshitela analyzing the U.S. presidential candidacy of Barack Obama.

"The State will kill your leaders. You've seen it happen before, with King, with Malcolm X and with other people who've been leaders. The State will put your leaders in jail. You've seen it happen before, with Marcus Garvey, with Joe Waller, right?"

"The State is to preserve the existing social system, preserve the things just as they are. So no matter what Barack Obama talks about, even if he had the guts to talk about something, ain't nothing that he can do that the State would allow."
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby jersey » Tue Mar 04, 2008 5:08 pm

Foster Care/Adoption BC Authority for urban First Nations foster children Vancouver Aboriginal Children and Family Services Society
http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/n...1-71128b2b4d8f
Aboriginal child services deal more than just a contract
Historic agreement covering 300 children is first of its kind in Canada
Daphne Bramham
Friday, February 29, 2008


For the first time in Canada, British Columbia is delegating its full responsibility and authority for urban first-nations foster children to an outside agency. The agreement, signed last week, goes far beyond any contracting of services. Starting in April, the Vancouver Aboriginal Children and Family Services Society will provide the full range of child and family services to more than 300 children, who come from more than 100 different first nations communities but have ended up in Metro Vancouver. The society will be responsible for reviewing, assessing and investigating reports of child abuse, neglect or exploitation.

It will be responsible for recruiting, vetting and supervising foster parents. In addition to the usual services, the society promises to provide the resources for the caregivers to pass on cultural and spiritual traditions to the children.

As the agreement says: "The parties acknowledge the need to address the unique historically based problems that face aboriginal children and the need to develop the means of assisting those children and families within the context of their aboriginal heritage, spirituality and culture."

More simply, both the government and the society recognize that first nations children need to be proud of who they are in order to succeed in life. Inherent in that statement is an acknowledgement that Canada's history of attempted cultural genocide didn't work. This is a bold and daring move by both the provincial government and a Vancouver-based aboriginal social services agency. It took seven years to negotiate, which is part of the reason the signing ceremony was such an emotional one. It was emotional not only for VACFSS president Kathy Louis, the other directors, staff and supporters, but for Tom Christensen, the Children and Family Development minister, and his deputy Lesley du Toit, whose support the society credits with having broken the negotiating stalemate. Along with singing, dancing, prayers and all of the key players being presented with ceremonial blankets , there were many hugs and some tears. But mostly there was hope that this might change the lives of children and provide a template for further agreements.

Louis is one of thousands of children sent to Indian residential schools. A Cree from northern Alberta, Louis says that at the school, she was told she was stupid. It took her many years to realize that she is anything but. Louis served 25 years on the National Parole Board and was instrumental in establishing elder-assisted hearings. She has received Canada's meritorious service medal, been honoured as a woman of distinction by the YWCA and as a distinguished alumna of Simon Fraser University.

What sustained Louis at the residential school -- and has made her so tenacious in her fight to get child protection authority delegated to the society -- is the spirituality and cultural traditions that her parents passed on to her. And she is convinced that if the society can provide that for children in care, there's a chance to turn around their lives and -- over time -- the shocking statistics.

Of the 9,000 children in foster care in B.C., nearly half are first nations children, even though they account for slightly more than 9% of the total child population. And each year the proportion of aboriginal foster children increases, because while the total number of children in government care is declining, the number of aboriginal children in care continues to increase annually.

In the ministry's Vancouver-Richmond region, nearly three-quarters of the aboriginal foster children are in continuing -- as opposed to temporary -- care, compared with 30% of the non-aboriginal children. Ted Hughes noted in his 2006 report on B.C.'s child protection services that because of the residential schools, several generations of first nations children never learned any parenting skills.

That legacy is apparent in almost every comparative statistic, whether it's health (one in eight aboriginal children is disabled, twice the national average), education (more than a quarter of working-age people didn't graduate from high school), crime (incarceration rates are nearly six times higher, urban crime rates are four and a half times higher) or unemployment (nearly three times the provincial average).

Small wonder that off-reserve first-nations children in Vancouver are 2 1/2 times more likely to come from single-parent households and almost twice as likely to live in homes needing major repairs.

Bernadette Spence, the society's chief executive officer, is convinced she can help turn those statistics around. However, both she and the ministry expect that initially, the number of children in care will jump by one-third or 100 children because aboriginal families are more likely to trust their children to the society than to the government. There is no fail-safe child protection system. Just as Matthew Vaudreuil and Sherry Charlie fell through the cracks in the provincial government's child-care system, at some point it is almost inevitable that a child will fall through some crack in the society's system. But that's a risk that must be taken. Because by every measure, the status quo is simply unacceptable, and has been for decades. dbramham@png.canwest.com
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Re: Canadian Genocide

Postby canada2004 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 10:07 pm

“What is it about winter that brings out the worst in some people? This winter is only half over and already it has been as cold as the icicles on a polar bear’s nose, but let’s get a grip on the situation? This is CN and it’s February.

Surely everyone who has chosen to live in this great country realizes CN’s climate is 10 months of winter and two months of bad ice.

He was thinking of the weather last week while slip-sliding along an icy sidewalk in my neighborhood. According to Environment, the total of snowfall (measured at Ham Airport) in the winter of 2002-2003 was 82.2 cm. In the winter before that we received 100.9 cm., and in 2000-2001, 154.5 cm. of snow in this area. The good news is that we seem to be getting less snow each year. By the winter of 2050, we should be strolling in shorts through the Royal Botanical Gardens. For now, we have little choice but to endure this chilly season, because there are three things that are certain about life in CN: death, taxes and winter. (There are also three rules to help get us through winter; unfortunately no one knows what they are.)

During an acrobatic walk on that glacial, frost-bitten day, as I gingerly maneuvered my way home along the snowy sidewalk, I devised some helpful, Zen-like tips that might help us get through this weather. (You may take them with a grain of salt!)

1. Never test the depth of the snow with both feet.
2. If you’re worried that no one knows you’re alive, drive really slowly on Barton Street after a snowfall.
3. If you HAVE to drive on Barton Street in winter, drive slowly but think quickly!
4. Do not walk behind me on a snowy, icy Ham sidewalk, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me, either. Just leave me the heck alone so I can get home without having to call for assistance.
5. Probably the most important one: never, ever miss an opportunity to go SOUTH for the winter.

Credit: The Spectator
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Re: Canadian Genocide -

Postby canada2004 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 10:10 pm

“What is it about winter that brings out the worst in some people? This winter is only half over and already it has been as cold as the icicles on a polar bear’s nose, but let’s get a grip on the situation? This is CN and it’s February.

Surely everyone who has chosen to live in this great country realizes CN’s climate is 10 months of winter and two months of bad ice.

He was thinking of the weather last week while slip-sliding along an icy sidewalk in my neighborhood. According to Environment, the total of snowfall (measured at Ham Airport) in the winter of 2002-2003 was 82.2 cm. In the winter before that we received 100.9 cm., and in 2000-2001, 154.5 cm. of snow in this area. The good news is that we seem to be getting less snow each year. By the winter of 2050, we should be strolling in shorts through the Royal Botanical Gardens. For now, we have little choice but to endure this chilly season, because there are three things that are certain about life in CN: death, taxes and winter. (There are also three rules to help get us through winter; unfortunately no one knows what they are.)

During an acrobatic walk on that glacial, frost-bitten day, as I gingerly maneuvered my way home along the snowy sidewalk, I devised some helpful, Zen-like tips that might help us get through this weather. (You may take them with a grain of salt!)

1. Never test the depth of the snow with both feet.
2. If you’re worried that no one knows you’re alive, drive really slowly on Barton Street after a snowfall.
3. If you HAVE to drive on Barton Street in winter, drive slowly but think quickly!
4. Do not walk behind me on a snowy, icy Ham sidewalk, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me, either. Just leave me the heck alone so I can get home without having to call for assistance.
5. Probably the most important one: never, ever miss an opportunity to go SOUTH for the winter.

Credit: The Spectator

A distressed Kamloops mom wants to hear from 22-year-old Yvonne Hubrechtsen -- one of the few people her daughter knew in Las Vegas before disappearing 21 months ago. Jessie Foster, a former Boston Pizza waitress in Kamloops, arrived in Las Vegas in May 2005. At the time, Hubrechtsen was one of the few friends her daughter talked about, according to mother Glendene Grant.
Jessie even gave her mother Hubrechtsen's phone number in case of emergencies. But when Jessie vanished without a trace in Las Vegas in March 2006, Grant said she tried several times to reach Hubrechtsen to no avail. So it was surprising for Grant to hear that Hubrechtsen was in Vancouver this week, until authorities picked her up and deported her back to the U.S. on Wednesday.

Grant believes her 23-year-old daughter has fallen into the hands of human-traffickers and forced into sex slavery. She says any information that Hubrechtsen may have about Jessie's life in Las Vegas could be helpful. "I'd like to get some information about what she knows about Jessie," says Grant. Hubrechtsen tried to enter B.C. on Dec. 12, but was refused entry. The next day, she entered at a different border crossing, according to Christopher Papp of the Canada Border Services Agency. Vancouver police spokesman Const. Tim Fanning says Hubrechtsen was pulled over in a black Hummer at Cambie and Robson on Sunday night. Police discovered she was wanted on a CBSA warrant and took her into custody. Hubrechtsen claimed she was in Vancouver to see family. But CBSA officials wanted her deported for failing to disclose her criminal background when gaining entry to B.C.
The Immigration and Refugee Board has now ordered Hubrechtsen inadmissable for the next two years for misrepresenting herself.
Hubrechtsen's criminal record includes three convictions of soliciting or engaging in prostitution in Las Vegas in 2004. She was also charged with two counts of transportation of a minor with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity, but the charges were dropped.

Grant says she doesn't know how Jessie befriended Hubrechtsen. However, the mother says Hubrechtsen introduced Jessie to Peter Todd, who became Jessie's boyfriend in Las Vegas and is believed to be the last person to have seen her. Jessie's case is being investigated by the North Las Vegas Police. It is also of interest to the Las Vegas-based Anti-Trafficking League Against Slavery. Terri Miller of ATLAS told The Province in June she suspects Foster was sold as a sex slave because the case has "many human-trafficking indicators."[/quote]
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